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Old 25th Apr 2007, 10:30   #31
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Default Re: Patrick O'Brian

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Originally Posted by gil View Post
Instead, there is a sinister love triangle, a long sea chase, terrible storms, capture by lesbian savages, we learn a lot about whaling, Aubrey loses touch with his ship twice, prisoners of war threaten to overwhelm him - if you've seen the movie, most of this will be news to you.
I'll say!
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Old 27th Apr 2007, 11:07   #32
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Default Re: Patrick O'Brian

I'm just gearing myself up to start HMS Surprise in the not too distant future.
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Old 28th Apr 2007, 14:54   #33
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Default Re: Patrick O'Brian

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capture by lesbian savages
Don't remember that bit, Gil!
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Old 28th Apr 2007, 16:13   #34
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Default Re: Patrick O'Brian

I'm not exaggerating, honest.
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Old 29th Apr 2007, 13:04   #35
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Default Re: Patrick O'Brian

Hmm, Notty and I will have to re-read. Would not have thought he would have forgotten this particular bit, even if I had.

I assume it's not in the film? How remiss of Hollywood.
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Old 21st May 2007, 16:30   #36
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Default Re: Patrick O'Brian


The Reverse of the Medal

Not my favourite book in the series. After an early section set at sea, this is mainly land-based. There is something not entirely authentic about the plot, based, as it is, on a real court case. Having said that, the book is pivotal to the character of Jack Aubrey, and ought to be read in sequence. And, to be honest, if it were some other author, I'd be fulsome in my praise. It's just not the best O'Brian book.
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Old 5th Jun 2007, 11:00   #37
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Default Re: Patrick O'Brian



The Letter of Marque
Very enjoyable nautical book. Jack Aubrey as buccaneer. Many of his problems solved and brushed aside, saving his restoration to the Navy list.

Maturin reunited with his quixotic wife, Diana, in a brief Swedish idyll.

I remembered last night that O'Brian is re-using names for women and ships. Sophie is the name of Aubrey's first ship, and his wife. Diane is the name of one of his subsequent ships (captured from the French in this book) and Diana the name of Maturin's wife, liberated from the French in a previous book.
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Old 12th Jul 2007, 12:21   #38
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Default The Thirteen Gun Salute



The Thirteen Gun Salute

Another gripping yarn, in which Aubrey is restored to the Navy List, and the dastardly (though often personable) French are dished in their attempt to extend their influence in the East Indies. The Admiralty spies from previous books (one cheat and one paedophile) are throughly served out. A rather loathsome group of Foreign Office gentlemen participate. There is also a charming idyllic interlude in which Maturin visits a "Lost World" plateau. And, early in the book, a terrifying encounter (see cover art) with a ship-eating precipitous lee shore.

I just gobble this stuff up, even the third time round, though I'm taking a break for a while in order to read some other books. When I'm into a Patrick O'Brian, I tend to read that in preference to anything else.
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Old 31st Jan 2015, 23:04   #39
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Default Re: Patrick O'Brian

Saw this, and knew there'd be a thread worth dusting off in the Palimp.

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In 1995, I was tapped to interview this man, the author Patrick O’Brian, beloved for his series of Napoleanic era sea stories, the so-called Aubrey/Maturin novels. They have been described as the successors to the works of C. S. Forester, or as “Jane Austen-at-sea.”

. . .

O’Brian was an intensely private man who lived and wrote in relative obscurity in the south of France near the Spanish border, where he’d moved from Britain in the late 1940s.

. . .

In 1995 he went on a U.S. book tour arranged by his New York publisher, W.W. Norton. He would hit only a few select cities — Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, New York and some others. The format was on-stage interviews — not your usual bookshop signings. I was tapped to interview him on stage in the two Northwest cities on that tour, Seattle and Portland.

. . .

I was made more nervous because I knew that O’Brian hated interviews on principle. A few years before, he had told Francis X. Clines of the New York Times that “Question-and-answer is not civilized.” He also asserted the right to keep his private life private. O’Brian, a man of culture, high literary achievement, a close friend of people like Pablo Picasso and Simone de Beauvoir and whose work was consider by some to be on the level of Austen’s, was being sent forth into America to capitalize on his success, yet in a format that he considered by definition to be barbaric.
Spotted it here, one of my favourite blogs these days. It's mostly pf writer/author interest, being the residence of a publishing lawyer, but it's often very interesting for its perspective on the industry, and you get links to things of interest like this one.
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