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Old 1st Sep 2003, 12:23   #21
amner
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Interesting that in American Gods, Gaiman references Chesterton:

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'There,' said Wednesday, 'is one who "does not have the faith and will not have the fun". Chesterton. Pagan indeed...'
And yes, a protagonist named after a day of the week. I wonder if Columbianus Rex's choice will have a similar faint echo with one of our previous choices??
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Old 14th Jun 2007, 18:10   #22
John Self
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Default Re: Book number 2 - THE MAN WHO WAS THURSDAY - discussion

Just read through this discussion having just finished The Man Who Was Thursday. Yes, amner, I suspect you're right to say that Chesterton would be one of those anti-science people Stephen Fry rails against. He is after all father of the maddening quote

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When people stop believing in God, they don't believe in nothing. They believe in anything.
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Old 14th Aug 2008, 13:29   #23
Michael
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Default Re: Book number 2 - THE MAN WHO WAS THURSDAY - discussion

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Just read through this discussion having just finished The Man Who Was Thursday. Yes, amner, I suspect you're right to say that Chesterton would be one of those anti-science people Stephen Fry rails against. He is after all father of the maddening quote
Chesterton anti-science??? I was going to just enjoy this thread until this incredible concept appeared.

Chesterton is one of the few popular authors who explicitly defendend the possibility of reconciling Darwinism (it was quite new at the time and the Nazis hadn't yet hijacked it - explicitly, as S. J. Gould pointed out) with Christianity without adding or subtracting from either.

To say that science doesn't know everything is just to say that science is human.

And if nature weren't a mystery, why on earth would we (still) study it?

Four years of hard graft on a Physics Masters convinced me that it's certainly still a mystery.

Seems to be mainly humanities students who worship a handful of egotistical scientists as fleshly gods ;) Chesterton was one of the few humanists who was positively and emphatically for science, and who saw it as the noble human endeavour that it is. As opposed to its ignobly divinised status today.

As in the Thursday book, it is more evidence that convinces one of science's awe before the mystery, not more theory.

Last edited by Michael; 14th Aug 2008 at 13:55. Reason: needed to add link to funny science comic
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