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Old 25th Jul 2006, 11:14   #1
Stewart
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Post Ian Cross: The God Boy

Were it not for my rather unnatural obsession as regards collecting all of the Penguin Classics, I may never have heard of The God Boy by New Zealand journalist, Ian Cross. Written in the late fifties, this debut novel falls somewhere between Salinger’s The Catcher In The Rye (which I am yet to read) and Doyle’s Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha. I believe it is hailed as a classic in his home land - in much the same way Grassic Gibbons’ Sunset Song is in Scotland – and forms (or at least once formed) part of the school curriculum – but don’t quote me on that.

The story is told by thirteen year old Jimmy Sullivan who is recounting the events in his life two years previous when his world changed forever. His world back then was the coastal town of Raggleton where he lived with his parents and went to Catholic school. His elder sister, Molly, lived in Wellington. Jimmy’s day to day activities include going to school, hanging around with his friends, and talking with an elderly Raggleton resident (called Bloody Jack) down by the harbour. When not embroiled in such pursuits he turns his attention to the question of God.

Jimmy has a problem with God. While the sisters at school feed him all the usual nonsense, his interpretation is that God is a literal being. And, when he is told that God frowns upon bad behaviour by punishing those that sin, Jimmy believes that he is being reprimanded from up on high when the family life around him begins to disintegrate. His father’s a drunk, his mother has a secret abortion, and their disdain for each other grows throughout the novel. Jimmy, always thinking he is to blame, attributes their arguments to the new bike he begged for and received and even offers to give it back if that will stop the trouble.

Aside from such innocence, Jimmy has some methods for dealing with the strife in his household. He calls them his ‘protection tricks’ and whenever his parents devolve into quarrel he finds solace in singing songs and plunging his hands into scalding hot water. His confusion around Catholic ritual is typically shown here in that, while he doesn’t care for all that religious stuff, his songs sometimes include the Hail Mary.

All through The God Boy, Jimmy’s anger grows until one day he lashes out at God and finds a new mean streak (swearing at an old lady, throwing stones at a friend, smashing a window) which, when the novel’s end comes around, Jimmy believes is what he is being punished for until he realises that he is not to blame – he’s made all the effort and God hasn’t even lifted a finger.

Like Doyle’s Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha, the narration by a child makes for interesting reading as you are forced to interpret what you are being told. Jimmy, of course, doesn’t know what an abortion is but by reading the clues as he describes the scene (early in the novel) you get the gist of what is happening. His monologue is punctuated with local phrases that emphasise the setting and the inclusion of a few American phrases hint that Raggleton – at its remotest – is not safe from outside influence.

Overall, The God Boy is an enjoyable portrait of a family falling apart through a young boy’s eyes and for all his protests about how he doesn’t care there is emotion within that allow you to see past his objections. I don’t think it’s as engaging as Doyle’s Booker winner but its nevertheless a good enough quick read.
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Old 25th Jul 2006, 11:44   #2
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Default Re: Ian Cross: The God Boy

Thanks for reviewing this, Blixa. I've seen it piled high in my local Waterstone's but, er, the word God in the title put me off as for some reason I thought it was a religious memoir.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blixa
Were it not for my rather unnatural obsession as regards collecting all of the Penguin Classics...
What's unnatural about that? (he asks, having recently ordered several Modern Classics from Canada that aren't available in the UK...)
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Old 25th Jul 2006, 11:53   #3
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Default Re: Ian Cross: The God Boy

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Self
Thanks for reviewing this, Blixa. I've seen it piled high in my local Waterstone's but, er, the word God in the title put me off as for some reason I thought it was a religious memoir.
It's anything but.

I only found out about it by going through Amazon and adding every Penguin Classic (silver and black) to my wishlist. It intrigued enough to buy it along with some of the other ones I've seen here that interested: Sloan Wilson, Robertson Davies, Raymond Chandler, and Patrick Hamilton.

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What's unnatural about that?
A guy my age should be thinking about a mortgage and not owning every book (except Sean Wright ones, of course) in the known world

Quote:
(he asks, having recently ordered several Modern Classics from Canada that aren't available in the UK...)
You cruel, cruel man. I want them now. Although the Robertston Davies ones are available in the UK: I have that edition of Fifth Business. Perhaps they are just not all released over here yet. How's that exchange rate working out?
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Old 25th Jul 2006, 12:06   #4
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Default Re: Ian Cross: The God Boy

Yes the Robertson Davies ones are available, and I got my current read, Mordecai Richler's The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz, in Waterstone's in London (and it has a pounds sterling price on the back as well as Canadian dollars) so I suspect many of them might be found in larger bookstores here, though most of them appear not to be listed on Amazon.co.uk. I ordered Brian Moore's Black Robe and a couple of Timothy Findleys from Amazon.ca. All the others are various books of Alice Munro stories and I wasn't that impressed with the one book of hers I read about ten years ago. The exchange rate is just over CDN$2 to £1 at the minute. Unfortunately they send stuff to the UK by surface mail so I expect to receive them around Christmas.
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Old 25th Jul 2006, 12:10   #5
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Default Re: Ian Cross: The God Boy

Well, in the meantime, there's Peter Schneider's The Wall Jumper to pick up, which I noticed in Borders a couple of weeks back:

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Old 25th Jul 2006, 12:13   #6
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Default Re: Ian Cross: The God Boy

It's quite good, more an episodic series of vignettes than a 'proper novel' - and very slim so a quick read!

I was thinking of picking up Damon Runyon's Guys and Dolls, but don't know if his stuff is actually any good or just famous for inspiring the musical etc.



And Fortress Besieged by some Chinese author whose name I can't remember.

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Old 25th Jul 2006, 12:29   #7
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Default Re: Ian Cross: The God Boy

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Self
I was thinking of picking up Damon Runyon's Guys and Dolls, but don't know if his stuff is actually any good or just famous for inspiring the musical etc.
Here's a quote from someone on another book forum I visit but play a less active part in, if it helps you make up your mind:

Quote:
Although not a crime writer per se, fans of American practitioners of the genre will find much to enjoy in Runyon's work - his ear for wise guy dialogue preceeded Chandler by the best part of 20 years. In fact, he was key in developing the hard boiled style of writing, mixing in slang and usually writing most of his prose in the present tense. I feel his place in literary history is very much overlooked.

Quote:
And Fortress Besieged by some Chinese author whose name I can't remember.
Ooh, I've seen that. I want that!

I've already got about 80 silvers on my computer desk top shelf and I'm willing to go without a bed or a floor just to fit more in.
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