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Old 1st Jun 2014, 9:22   #1
Colyngbourne
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Default Bookaday - June 2014

From Lizzy Siddal on Facebook -- HarperCollins imprint The Borough Press is launching a social initiative for book lovers to share books they love, on Twitter or other social media ...anyone else want to join in?





1st June - Favourite book from childhood:

I'm taking this as "young childhood" as opposed to serious bookreading childhood (which would include Narnia, Moomins, Treasure Island etc) -

On the fact that the books are falling apart with being read so much:

The Naughtiest Girl in the School (series) - Enid Blyton.



On the grounds that boarding school sounded exciting: piano lessons, baby rabbits, different teachers for different subjects, tuckboxes - but also a school run on self-governing, socialist principles (aside from the fact that one had to pay to attend in the first place!) - all pocket money handed in to a common moneybox and everyone given the same allowance; the children forming their own (fair-minded) judiciary for sorting out bullying and other troubles.

2nd June - Best Bargain:

this is quite a hard one. And obviously the 50p I paid in April for the 1784 Jan-June volume of the Monthly Review was indeed a bargain but I am choosing a book I found last year randomly, for a £1 donation, in a stately home in North Yorkshire which had a booksale shelf.

"Farthing" by Jo Walton - the first of a trilogy (now all read and, I think, reviewed hereabouts.... here



This is a treat of an alt-history murder-mystery set in a 1940's country house in a world where the UK made an appeasement pact with Hitler.

I've followed Jo Walton's blog for several years but had never got around to reading her books, so this was a bargain which has led to some very good reading indeed. Walton's "Sense & Sensibility with dragons" novel, Tooth & Claw is equally brilliant - and I've just bought Among Others, her Hugo & Nebula award-winning novel.

3rd June - One With A Blue Cover

I was surprised how many there were - Potter's Good King Richard?, a bunch of well-loved Jean Ure's from the 1980's, Reeve's Predator's Gold, Adams' Girl in a Swing and several more. But the one where the blueness seems integral to the essence of the book is -

Longman's Kennedy's Shorter Latin Primer (1966 ed.)



Scuffed white edges, from the days when my comprehensive was a grammar school (Barry Hines, Donald Pleasance) - declensions of dozens of nouns and adjectives, conjugations of verbs and tenses - when to use quisque and uterque, and quidam (declining); ablative absolutes, oratio obliqua, gerundives (*loved* gerundives, for some reason and never understood supines)....

4th June - Least Favourite Book by Favourite Author


Does that mean "my favourite author" or "a favourite author"? I have several favourites: some I would instantly buy a copy regardless, so maybe one of them. Between Diana Wynne Jones (with a good 33 of her books on my shelves), Ian McEwan, and maybe someone like Sonya Hartnett.

Conveniently, I have just finished my "least favourite book" by Sonya Hartnett who is definitely one of my favourite YA authors:

What the Birds See
Sleeping Dogs
Stripes of the Sidestep Wolf
Thursday's Child
The Silver Donkey
Surrender
The Ghost's Child
Butterfly


are all stunning books but this one just misses the mark:



beautifully observed sibling behaviour, WW2 atmosphere, great descriptions (for the most part), but also some mis-steps, not least of which that she takes a wholly Tudor line on Richard III, his character, his possible deeds or misdeeds. Another missed chance to take a different line, and possibly educate today's children/YA about the difficulties of assessing the truth across 500 years. The magical realism doesn't bleed through enough into the plot and it becomes rather vague as to its focus - sometimes with one character, sometimes with another.


5th June - A Book That Doesn't Belong to Me

Half a lifetime ago when I was living on the Welsh borders, I spent a couple of years in the local NWR, and someone loaned me this book to read for their next meeting/bookgroup. I neither read the book or ever attended another meeting due to a variety of reasons and we moved away not long after. I still haven't read it and have no inclination to but it still has a home on our shelves.



6th June - The One I Always Give As A Gift

I don't generally give books I love to everyone indiscriminately. Most of my favourite books are a wee bit eclectic and sometimes a little YA-based. However, this book I have given to at least two people because it is a Jolly Good Read and Totally Intriguing! And I made my bookgroup read it too, if that counts. And it has a beautiful cover in this edition.





7th June - Forgot I Owned It

There are a couple of books I'm never sure whether I own or not - The Grapes of Wrath, and either the final book in the Chaos Walking trilogy or the final book in the Hunger Games trilogy - but this book I nearly bought last week in Sheffield. Then I spotted it two days ago on the shelves under our stairs. Phew!




8th June - Have More Than One Copy

Apart from sets of Laura Ingalls and Narnia collected for the kids, I have five duplicates (Beverley Nichols Down the Garden Path" Jan Mark's Aquarius, Ford Madox Ford's Parade's End, Rosemary Hawley Jarman's We Speak No Treason) but only one where I would keep buying more copies if the illustrative plates were different: I have three, possibly four copies of this: if you Google Image the book, there are dozens of pictorial covers but the best are the oldest with glassine papers protecting the internal illustrations. There was a tempting near-First Edition on sale in Sedbergh a couple of years ago - sadly £100 too pricey....




9th June - A Film or TV Tie-In -

There are lots of books made into films, but I was thinking the intention was to find one of those books with a tie-in front cover, and this was pretty much my only one.

I bought this after seeing the superb film with Paul Bettany and Jennifer Connolly, knowing the original book was called "Annie's Box" but here it is with film- tie-in cover:




10th June - a day behind: Reminds Me Of Someone I Love -

I have read this book but it is one that was Mr Col's before we married, and I associate it with him very much, and various anti-apartheid/aid for Southern Africa things that were happening where we were studying when we were courting. This is not the cover picture of the edition we have - which appears not to be on the internet at all, but is an old Penguin version nonetheless.





11th June - Secondhand Bookshop Gem -

Trying not to duplicate choices, the 'gem' was not so much *one* book as a whole stack of Somerset Maughams I found in a very good Keswick 2nd-hand bookshop when I was about 15: this pic will suffice to represent the fourteen or so Maughams I picked up, hardback and paperback, for 50p's and similar, when I was in a teenage Maugham-fixation after reading The Razor's Edge -



12th June - I Pretend To Have Read It -

Not sure I pretend to have read books - not that I'm over-virtuous on this. But I'd rather say I'd never got around to it. I *feel* as if I have read Jude the Obscure but I haven't - don't know what that's about!

Possibly, because I have half-read it, I sometimes act as if I have read all of - I just can't bring myself to read it all - totally uncompelling, weirdly....

13th June - Makes Me Laugh

I'm saving Mr Beverley Nichols for another day later in the month - possibly.

This book is a real treat - and I laughed a lot when I read it a couple of months ago - it's already on my re-read list - written in alternate chapters by the wonderful David Levithan and John Green.



14th June - Old Favourite -

there are a few of course, but this will do: my favourite Austen by far (though usually other people's least favourite) and re-read many times - this is my old battered copy from yesteryear:





15th June - Favourite Fictional Father
I find myself unable to pick a fictional father who is faulty, if amusing (Emma's father in Austen, Mr Bennett too). And in children's and YA lit, fathers (and parents) are generally absent or behave appallingly (eg. Polly's father, Reg, in Fire & Hemlock by Diana Wynne Jones). A cunning twist would be to pick Frank Cottrell Boyce's Cosmic - a terrific (and funny!) book all about fathers and sons, in which the son pretends to be and has to learn to be a father to gain a prize-winning trip to the moon.

But a favourite, for me, implies good fathering, and the best example I can think of in literature that I love, is Caleb Garth in Middlemarch: he not only fathers his own children well but teaches the feckless Fred Vincey how to be a better man, and one worthy of his daughter's hand: not by humiliating him or chastising him constantly either. If you had to pick a dad from literature, you'd want him, I think.



16th June - Can't Believe More People Haven't Read -

Took this on hols the other year and most of the family hadn't read it. It was chosen for my bookgroup read for next month's meeting, and quite a few of our group haven't read it. I suspect it's one that's generally well-known but seldom read.

A great great book though - looking forward to revisiting it: and watching both films again



17th June - Future Classic

Besides being inordinately busy all this week, I found this difficult because when does something turn into a "classic"? Some which I consider might "turn into" might already be considered in that category (some Ishiguro, McEwan). Instead I'm going to post one which I hope becomes a classic because it deserves it:




18th June - Bought on a Recommendation

This one - well, I don't know who recommended it but I would be grumpy with them - I heard about it being recommended last autumn and spent good Xmas money on it, and have found it very disappointing indeed - and still haven't finished it. I also bought the sequel second-hand before I began it, so I'm doubly-disappointed. Once I began reading, I realised that I had read Paul Hoffman before - The Wisdom of Crocodiles (made into a bad film with Jude Law, I think) - good grief, that's an obscure and hard and dissatisfying read too.....

On an up-note, Digger recommended Kent Haruf whilst on our Big Day Out in Bath, so I have bought Benediction all ready for my summer hols




19th June - Still Can't Stop Talking About It

A certain quotient of folk here will have heard me banging on about this one for a few years now. I wasn't over-satisfied with a recent TV adaptation (despite the lovely Mr Cumberbatch) but the brilliance of this book strikes me over and over again. I'm not particularly into modernist writing but Tony Tanner's foreword/introduction to the Penguin Classic Mansfield Park nudged me in the direction of another passive hero 'par excellence' - and the deep torments and complications of the life of Christopher Tietjens. I love it to bits, have re-read it a number of times and had never known that it existed until a handful of years ago.

It is actually a tetralogy - Some Do Not...., No More Parades, A Man Could Stand Up, and The Last Post (which makes me cry) - but is usually published in one volume -




20th June - Favourite Cover

Torn between wonderful things. Some grown-up books are very pretty - esp. these days when they are re-issuing titles with decorated hardcovers. Bernard Beckett's Genesis is an example of very appealing artwork on a cover.

Favourite cover is between the one that tugs my heart-strings and reminds me of one of the core passages written in children's lit: the awful night on the broken Stone Table passed by Lucy and Susan and then its aftermath....



and a riproaring bit of YA steampunk that is one of the top tetralogies any teen or adult can read: the pic is my favourite of the four book-covers




21st June - Summer Read

Senior daughter had a long fondness for reading Kevin Brooks Lucas on summer holiday. I don't have a regular summer read - but this summer in south-west France I will be reading:




22nd June - Out of Print -

a lot of children's/YA books I like are now out of print but thanks to the internet, most can be sourced from one second-hand site or another.

Astrid Lindgren's All About the Bullerby Children ; Hila Feil's The Ghost Garden; and a whole stack of Jan Mark (about to be available on Kindle at least)..... thankfully I have my originals on the shelf opposite my desk....

and since I will be picking a Jan Mark in a few days, this is really the one that is horrendously out of print - only one used copy available on Amazon at £72. I have my copy still, bought from the school book club in 1974 - and loved to bits by the younger Col girls too. It still gets a re-read every October.




23rd June - A Book You Were Made to Read at School -

I enjoyed pretty much all the books we read at secondary school - good teachers provided inspiring reading and a lot of it, compared to how narrow the reading expectations are today.

But this one - read in either 4th yr Juniors (Yr 6 in modern coinage) or 1st yr Secondary (Yr 7) - I hated. It evoked all my unfathomable dislike for Dickens (this is Dickenesque enough to bear the comparison), the grimness of the late C18th setting, and an antipathy to things set in London with ragamuffins, good-hearted gentlemen and Artful Dodger types. I loathed every moment of it - we had to read it out loud as well, an added torture. I shudder even at the author name & title.




24th June - Hooked Me Into Reading -

When I was about six, I was already an eager reader of lots of Enid Blyton, but I also envied my brother who had "collections" of books - Hardy Boys, Biggles, The Three Investigators and such - but the Willard Prices were the books that I borrowed and read one after another (before I borrowed all the others series my brother owned ) - : did I prefer Hal or Roger? Which was the best book? Was Kaggs the worst villain of them all? Who cried when Dr Blake got his foot trapped in a giant clam?




25th June - Never Finished It -

Usually I do finish a book - there are a handful where I haven't (some of which are sat right now by the front door awaiting return to their owners, semi-read) and this was a biggie and a disappointment to boot.

I think with this one, I finally realised I don't want to read a book about vampires ever again, unless it's my own. This was tedious, clichéd - just awful in every respect.




26th June - Should Have Sold More Copies -

most readers don't know how many copies have ever been sold of the books they like - other than the biggies like Harry Potter or Dan Brown or something - but two books by Jan Mark (most books by Jan Mark indeed) should have sold more copies: she won the Carnegie medal twice and was Highly Commended for a third, though sadly not on these two books, which I regard as strong as any of her Awarded work (also the Rank/Observer prize for teen fiction). Mark died tragically early for someone as unique and powerful in children's/YA writing as she was - many many tears in this household - & I would recommend any of her work without hesitation.

Eclipse of the Century is bizarre, a modern British youth ending up living in an abandoned town museum in a lost border town in the middle of Asia (Qantoum, Iskanderistan) with a community of wanderers, outcasts, millennial sun-worshippers and some very weird locals. It's also compelling in the weird way Mark had of making strange lives relevant. (It also has one of my favourite cover illustrations ever.)

Useful Idiots - which I am currently re-reading - takes a future UK, reduced by rising sea levels to "the Rhine Delta Islands", a disputed & exhumed body on land belonging to the "Inglish" natives; a disturbing practice of growing "human pearls" in the joints of wrists and a serious look at the issues of racialism & federalism.

It's a book for anyone involved in the issue of human burial ethics and "ownership of remains", or the "museumification" (as Will Self put it in an article last week) of historical artefacts: any interested Ricardians, this one is especially for you at this time!





27th June - Want To Be One Of The Characters -

I needed to consult on this one: and I think I would be happy to be one of the characters in Diana Wynne Jones' Charmed Life - possibly Chrestomanci's (Christopher Chant's) secretary, Tom, or his friend Michael Saunders who is tutor to Chrestomanci's children, or Millie his wife.




28th June - Bought At My Favourite Independent Bookshop -

I don't have a favourite independent bookshop. But I do know that one of the best children's/YA bookshops near me is in Penrith - and I usually find unusual and hard-to-find volumes there (Waterstones is next to useless these days unless it's a huge city store): and this is a book I bought in Penrith a handful of years ago. More adult than Young Adult - and very very impressive:

Genesis by Bernard Beckett

And I think this is the bookshop... http://www.hive.co.uk/shop/penrith/wordsworth



29th June - The One I Have Re-Read Most Often -

Not sure - I'm not going to count reading Naughtiest Girl in the School whenever I feel poorly!

So probably a toss-up between the Narnia Chronicles, Mansfield Park and Parade's End, Fire & Hemlock by Diana Wynne Jones, and this one, on a re-read right now:



30th June - Final Day - Would Save If My House Burned Down - Part One -

This can't just be one book: my first choice (choices) are currently stored on a memory stick, as well as on hard-drive, but I would be more bereft than Jo in Little Women if I didn't save the memory stick. Still going by the nerdy titles of Via Descent and Via Media (plus associated writings), I'd save my own stories, two full-length novels as yet unpublished (very nearly but not). The first two pics will do to represent their themes:






30th June - Final Day - Would Save If My House Burned Down - Part Two -

As for a "real" book to save, it would always be this one: my first small copy of Cloister.... ,printed in the early 1900's: the story of Gerard and Margaret, fictional parents of the child who would become Erasmus; an over-wrought Victorianised "medieval-style" story of lovers separated by circumstance, unfeeling parents, jealous siblings, evil burgomasters and the medieval church.





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Old 1st Jun 2014, 14:08   #2
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Default Re: Bookaday - June 2014

1st June - Favourite book from childhood -

I loved Ramona the Pest by Beverly Cleary. I shared a room with two sisters, and our mum would sit on the floor in the hall reading to us when we went to bed. She couldn't stop giggling at this one.
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Old 1st Jun 2014, 14:46   #3
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Default Re: Bookaday - June 2014

1st June - Favourite book from childhood:

The Weirdstone of Brisingamen by Alan Garner. I'd have been in my final year of primary school, so 10 years old (my birthday was right at the end of the school year), and although I read quite happily to myself my Mum read this one to me for some reason, so it is memorable for that fact. But also for the fact that it was set around Alderley Edge - at that age I found this amazing: all this strange and exciting stuff going on with wizards and warriors sleeping under the hill was happening up here, in Cheshire, not twenty miles away.

2nd June - Best bargain:

Tricky one this - these days it's so easy to pick up books for a penny (plus postage) online, or for a pound or two, that "bargain" is almost the norm. So I'm going back to the days when "The Sales" in a bookshop were still an event and choosing Kazuo Ishiguro's The Unconsoled. I picked up the hardback in a sale at Hammick's in 1996 or 97 for £5, having at the time just read and loved The Remains of the Day, but didn't realise until I got it home that it was a signed first edition. And I still haven't got around to reading it!

3rd June - One with a blue cover:

So many here to choose from, many with much bluer covers, but I'm going for Abdulrazak Gurnah's Admiring Silence (Hamish Hamilton, 1996, cover illustration by Debbie Lush). Why this one? Well, it's a good book for one thing and Gurnah is an author I always enjoy, but back when this was released I was just starting my second year of a BA in Illustration and floundering somewhat. My strength at that point was drawing, but I was struggling to find a visual identity as an illustrator, and above all struggling with colour. This cover (along with others by Jeff Fisher and Christopher Corr, not to mention the paintings of Raoul Dufy), really spoke to me: she's painted the landscape of Zanzibar blue because it makes that red house sing and because it relates to a vibrant East African palette of spice markets and islamic decoration, of painted houses, sea and sky. It taught me not to be scared of colour and was a huge influence on me.

4th June - Least favourite book by a favourite author:

Whenever I read a book by an author I've not tried before and don't like it, I am almost always prepared to give that author a second chance (they don't get a third though). My reasoning for this is simple: I always think "supposing the first Salman Rushdie I'd read had been Fury? Would I have ever read anything else by him?". I've liked, often loved, everything of Rushdie's I've read (even The Ground Beneath Her Feet) but Fury is an absolute disaster of a novel.
PS: I've picked Rushdie as a favourite author, as among my other favourites I couldn't think of a book I'd hated as much as I did Fury.

5th - 7th June:

I couldn't answer any of these. I have no books that don't belong to me (I don't like borrowing things and if I do I give it straight back); for gifts I give books that I think the recipient will enjoy so there isn't a book I regularly force on people; and I've never forgotten owning any book.

8th June - Have more than one copy:

There are a few of these. Usually it is where I've got a 'standard' edition and a Folio Society one, examples being The Remains of the Day, Midnight's Children, The Greengage Summer, A Month in the Country and To Kill a Mockingbird. I also have both the UK and US editions of a couple of books. However having multiple identical copies of a book is something of an occupational hazard for me...



Last edited by David; 8th Jun 2014 at 14:56.
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Old 1st Jun 2014, 21:07   #4
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Default Re: Bookaday - June 2014

I had to read that as part of my Year 6 (4th yr juniors), like yourself, David.

I've tried to pick something that was an early favourite, pre-7 yrs old - but later ones would definitely include Narnia, and also Beverley Nichols' "The Tree That Sat Down" (which sent me on my grown-up Nichols' extended reading spree some thirty years later). My 3rd yr junior teacher, Mr Traves, read that with us and everyone loved it.
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Old 2nd Jun 2014, 1:00   #5
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Default Re: Bookaday - June 2014

1st June - Favourite book from childhood:

In the Time of the Dinosaurs (1963) by William Wise, was bought for me when I was about five or six years old and I thought I'd long since lost it. But in 2012, I found it carefully tucked away in a box stored in the loft at my parent's house. I didn't read that many books as a child but I used to read this one all the time. The condition of the cover shows I took great care of it, and fortunately none of the pages are loose or missing.


Another favourite childhood book also found in the loft was Ghost Town Treasure (1957) by Clyde Robert Bulla.
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Old 2nd Jun 2014, 13:48   #6
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Default Re: Bookaday - June 2014

1 June Favourite book from Childhood

Mr NeverLost A. Turnbull

Delightful book. I read it at age 8. Pre- Arthur Ransome.

2 June Best Bargain

Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens
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Old 2nd Jun 2014, 20:08   #7
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As much as I love other Ishiguro, esp. Never Let Me Go, I think The Unconsoled is his most impressive and remarkable book. I hope you enjoy reading it, David.
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Old 3rd Jun 2014, 0:46   #8
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2nd June - Best Bargain:

In 2000 I bought the hardback of An Instance of the Fingerpost (1997) by Iain Pears from one of the secondhand bookshops on Charing Cross Road for only £4.
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Old 3rd Jun 2014, 12:00   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colyngbourne View Post
As much as I love other Ishiguro, esp. Never Let Me Go, I think The Unconsoled is his most impressive and remarkable book. I hope you enjoy reading it, David.
Well, given it has been sitting on my shelves for about seventeen years it probably is time I gave it a go!
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Old 3rd Jun 2014, 19:03   #10
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3rd June - One with a Blue Cover:

City of Ice (1999) by John Farrow (pseudonym of Trevor Ferguson). The first book in the Detective Émile Cinq-Mars series, a series that's set in Montreal. A really good novel, and one I've actually reread. It's also a favourite cover because when I first read it back in 2000, a friend who used to work in a bookshop gave me one of the spare posters (about 2 feet high) the shop had from the book's promotion. And then there is the book's dedication:
  • "In memoriam Daniel Desrochers (1984-1995) a child of Montreal killed by a biker's bomb at age eleven."

    (Relates to a drugs turf war in Montreal between two biker gangs that grew in intensity during 1994 and 1995. On 9th Aug 1995 a car bomb left by one of the gangs exploded, killing the driver, an alleged drugs-dealer. Unfortunately eleven year-old Daniel Desrochers was walking by on the opposite side of the street when the bomb exploded, he was struck by debris and died after four days in a coma.)
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