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Wavid
3rd Jan 2006, 9:03
We got a Freeview box over Xmas, and I have been desperatley searching for decent stuff to watch on it ever since.

So here's a thread to flag up when good things crop up on telly.

Here's one for starters: ITV3 at 7 tonight: Jeeves and Wooster!

Colyngbourne
3rd Jan 2006, 13:15
They're repeating Quantum Leap on ITV 3 every evening. For those of us who were fans in the early 90's.
There's a brainiac quiz on BBC4 that we've watched sometimes - lateral thinking, that I'm no good at.

Digger
3rd Jan 2006, 13:28
Ah Quantam Leap, fond memories indeed!

Does this mean you get More4? I keep seeing trailers on 4 for things I want to watch but cant because you need a decent aerial on your house to get a settop box and our land-lord is hopeless at sorting such things out!

JunkMonkey
3rd Jan 2006, 13:31
"Decent Telly" is an oxymoron - apart from CeeBeebies; that's worth the licence fee alone.

Colyngbourne
3rd Jan 2006, 13:36
Ah Quantam Leap, fond memories indeed!

Does this mean you get More4? I keep seeing trailers on 4 for things I want to watch but cant because you need a decent aerial on your house to get a settop box and our land-lord is hopeless at sorting such things out!


Yes, E4 and More4. But my parents have got a similar problem with their aerial and reception now they've got a digital TV.

Wavid
3rd Jan 2006, 13:43
You might be lucky, digger. We didn't upgrade our (probably) very ancient aerial and still get all the main channels. The box was only around £25 so it's woth a punt - you can always take it back!

Digger
3rd Jan 2006, 13:47
our aerial problem is that we don't have one on the house - or rather we do, but it's pointing the wrong direction and doesn't appear to be connected to the plug in the house. We have a set top aerial and signal booster that gets waved around every evening and propped on various boxes, stacks of books, chairs, depending on its fickleness! I don't think that any amount of waving it about will make a set top box worth it at the mo! :-(

Wavid
3rd Jan 2006, 14:17
Oh dear. That does sound like a pretty poor arrangement! Bad luck!

Digger
3rd Jan 2006, 14:20
makes for some interesting living room aerial tower constructions. :roll:

chillicheese
3rd Jan 2006, 14:27
makes for some interesting living room aerial tower constructions. :roll:
That's got to be worth a flickr pic 8)

John Self
3rd Jan 2006, 14:36
We have a set top aerial and signal booster that gets waved around every evening and propped on various boxes, stacks of books, chairs, depending on its fickleness!

Me too! Of course the optimum position always turns out to be holding the signal booster in your hand precisely five feet off the floor so you can't sit down while you watch. I live at the bottom of a hill which means for some reason I don't even get Channel Five - so it's not all bad. I am certain I wouldn't have a strong enough signal for digital. And as I live in an apartment, and the title deeds are strict about not putting up any 'erections' (ooer, obviously) on the outside, eg roof aerial or satellite dish, and as the forecourt is shared and the cable TV people never get permission from all the owners to dig it up, it looks like I am stuck with four channels for the foreseeable future... Until they turn off the analoge signal, of course, which will simply things in one sense.

Digger
3rd Jan 2006, 15:12
Ah JS, a familiar story!

Ours, perversly, can be coaxed and cajoled into providing a relatively good signal, when the weather's right, but collapses into static if anyone sits in the armchair, the comfy one that everyone wants to sit in! Settop aerials are sent from the devil to try us, I guarantee it!

stella
3rd Jan 2006, 15:23
Did anyone catch Balderdash & Piffle on 2 last night at 9pm? I meant to watch it but got distracted by Rebus. S'all about words & derivations and stuff. It's a series I believe.

Miriamaok
3rd Jan 2006, 15:49
I finally gave in and got Skyplus just over a year ago so have about 800 stations - at least 99% of which are terrible. However I've become addicted to The Amazing Race on Living 2. It's a travel show crossed with a reality show that's smart and funny. Clever casting, wonderful editing and great pacing. I'm also looking forward to Shameless coming back this evening. I love Paul Abbott's work but wonder if it will survive now that Steve and Fiona, two of the main characters, have left.

Wavid
8th Jan 2006, 21:05
Curb Your Enthusiasm first series is being shown every sunday at 9.30 on More 4! Am going for quick bath so I am out in time!

stella
8th Jan 2006, 21:07
To stop myself from thinking about Wavid/Wogan in the bath I'll fess up: I love Charmed, CSI (all three cities), Will & Grace, Scrubs & ANTM (that's America's Next Top Model to all you sensible people who would never touch it with a bargepole) Yes, am addicted to shit Living TV and enjoy every second, even the repeats. I think of it as brain-ease time. A couple of hours of Charmed makes reading Derrida seem like a pleasant distraction.

chillicheese
8th Jan 2006, 22:11
The BBC two part Three Men In A Boat was surprisingly good, you know, for an amusing yet pointless telly thingy.

gil
9th Jan 2006, 10:21
We introduced a loft aerial - this one http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Main_Index/Aerials_Index/Aerials_Loft/ - to one part of the house a couple of years ago in which we'd been struggling with set-top aerials. It is FANTASTIC and easy to fit. If there's anywhere to put it, that is.

amner
9th Jan 2006, 10:31
I think one of the things that didn't impress me so much was that there was none of the going for the jugular that the British equivalents of this show would do. The Office, of course, and bits of Extras were toe-curling in the extreme, and on a couple of occasions, CYE could have gone down this road and didn't, preferring anti-climax to out-and-out horror.

Boy, are you in for a shock.

Wavid
9th Jan 2006, 10:33
Aha! So it does get better/worse then?

amner
9th Jan 2006, 10:39
I think that's the way to look at it, yeah. Larry's a great character, with the sort of social bravura and truth that we often wish we all had, but taken to extremes. And he never learns, because he doesn't think he has to.

Why the gorgeous Cheryl sticks with him is a mystery.

chillicheese
10th Jan 2006, 9:38
too busy watching B&P on BBC2 (http://palimpsest.org.uk/forum/showthread.php?t=1630)

amner
10th Jan 2006, 9:40
Recorded it for later, too busy enjoying Life on Mars on BBC1.

Digger
16th Jan 2006, 9:45
So Daveybot was bored and went out and got a set-top box just to see if would work over the weekend. And it does! Reception actually got better - as long as the set-top aerial is sitting on the Quality Street tin (it's picky about location apparently). More4tastic! For somereason we don't get 5 at all, no loss there apart from CSI, and BBC4 which is much more annoying. But the Daily Show, Hooray!

amner
17th Jan 2006, 15:18
...the John Simm time-travel cop show...

Life on Mars is fast becomming the best thing on the telly at the moment. Anyone else watching it?

Great, hearty belly-laugh at the start of this week's episode with the unfit coppers chasing an unfit villain out of the swimming baths with just their trunks on. As an antidote to the impeccably carved out pecs and perfect teeth brigade we get these days, this was just magic.

And who would have thought the Test Card girl could be so freaked out creepy?

ono no komachi
17th Jan 2006, 15:25
I found the Test Card Girl pretty scary when I was a nipper - I think they tapped into a genuine vein of fear there. Clowns are scary too; she was accompanied by one and they were both looking out of the screen at you as though you interrupted them in some kind of hideous conspiracy...

I think I'd better run away and find a nice quiet place to hide.

Digger
17th Jan 2006, 15:31
clowns were scary in Steven King's It, until they all turned into giant spiders, which wasn't scary at all.

Colyngbourne
22nd Jan 2006, 7:46
Sing ho, for decent telly on a Saturday night - Peter Ackroyd's The Romantics - which overdid itself a little on the visuals (this happened in London too) but was otherwise a very nuggety introduction to the birth and development of ideas behind that fulcrum of history - the French revolution. I liked almost all of it, bar the extensive brooding Ackroyd did on cross-channel ferries, and repreated images of blood trickling across frosty paved streets.

The dramatised pieces worked visually - couldn't fault any of the actors: David Threlfall excellent as Wordsworth, Dudley Sutton as Blake and David Tennant as Rousseau (:-D ), but they had a disconcerting and offputting way of dissolving into particles of golden light and toddling off into the ether when they'd said their bit. All a bit too much Dr Who, I think. Either that or the metaphor that they're with us still in our society, swirling around like golden cosmic dust.

Miriamaok
6th Feb 2006, 15:54
Tongiht BBC Four are showing Wisconsin Death Trip (http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbcfour/listings/programme.shtml?day=today&filename=20060206/20060206_2245_4544_24031_75) as part of the Arena Strand. I did some promotional work on this when it was originally released and would recommend it to anyone. It a mix of gothic horror and quirky documentary.

From the official website- (http://www.wisconsindeathtrip.com/about.html)

Lesy discovered a striking archive of black and white photographs in the town of Black River Falls dating from the 1890’s and married a selection of these images to extracts from the town’s newspaper from the same decade. The effect was surprising and disturbing. The town of Black River Falls seems gripped by some peculiar malaise and the weekly news is dominated by bizarre tales of madness, eccentricity and violence amongst the local population. Suicide and murder are commonplace. People in the town are haunted by ghosts, possessed by devils and terrorized by teenage outlaws and arsonists.

Colyngbourne
6th Feb 2006, 16:00
I'm afraid I'm still in deep mourning for the unjust elimination of John Barrowman from Dancing On Ice two days ago. I need John Simm tonight rather than southern Gothic, to re-address the balance.

ono no komachi
6th Feb 2006, 16:04
Oh no! So I won't be 'accidentally' lighting on ITV1 this Saturday night as I have the last couple then... (cough)

Goshdarnit, if ever there was anyone who could carry off a star-spangled-sequined lycra suit....

Stewart
6th Feb 2006, 16:09
You do know he's gay, don't you?

amner
6th Feb 2006, 16:11
Simm or Barrowman?

Colyngbourne
6th Feb 2006, 16:11
Goshdarnit, if ever there was anyone who could carry off a star-spangled-sequined lycra suit....

Indeed. :-D
(You could always accidentally switch on The Sound of Musicals on BBC1 and watch him sing...)

We blame Kelly Holmes. Who cannot skate or behave with any grace.
Our children cried.

Stewart
6th Feb 2006, 16:12
Simm or Barrowman?

Barrowman. I've no idea who John Simm is.

Miriamaok
6th Feb 2006, 16:13
I happened to catch Mr Barrowman on GMTV this morning and he was still feeling very hard done by. Which wasn't helped by Fiona's drooling over David Seaman. I've tried to avoid Dancing on Ice as I already watch enough crap reality stuff - Project Catwalk, American's Next Top Model, The Amazing Race etc.

Thank you Sky for Skyplus that allows me to record Life on Mars while watching The Amazing Race. The other thing that I'm really getting into at the moment is Veronica Mars except now it's disappeared off the schedule again.

Colyngbourne
6th Feb 2006, 16:13
You do know he's gay, don't you?

Yes. In a 14 yr relationship with an architect.
But we can still adore him!

Stewart
6th Feb 2006, 16:14
What's The Amazing Race? Some sort of Nazi Idol show, or something?

Miriamaok
6th Feb 2006, 16:19
Ha! It's an American reality show where teams race around the world to win a million dollars. They do get to go to pretty amazing places but the real attraction is the strategy, alliances and general back-stabbing that takes place especially at airline counters. More Info here (http://www.televisionwithoutpity.com/show.cgi?show=76). I think season 6 is starting tonight on Living TV here. We're a couple of seasons behind the US.

ono no komachi
6th Feb 2006, 16:39
You do know he's gay, don't you?

It doesn't really have any relevance, since it's not as though if he was hetero I could go round to his house and he'd fall in love with me.

John Simm is married with kid(s), but he's still lovely too.

[high 5s with Col!]

Miriamaok
6th Feb 2006, 16:45
Looks like Barrowman will soon be married with kids too - more here (http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/article/ds27841.html).

Stewart
6th Feb 2006, 16:56
I'll be interested to see his new show, Torchwood, when it airs. It was mentioned in the Doctor Who Christmas special.

JunkMonkey
6th Feb 2006, 17:47
A Dr Who spinoff? The Fools!Don't they remember K9 and Friends????

Colyngbourne
6th Feb 2006, 18:38
Yes, I read that about the possibility of them having children. And Torchwood has been put back from a possible June/July start to the September, I think. But it should be better than K9 and Friends as it's likely to be post-watershed.

*high-5's back to ono* :-D

ono no komachi
9th Feb 2006, 8:50
I see Charlie Brooker's Screen Burn (http://media.guardian.co.uk/broadcast/story/0,,1704667,00.html) is coming to a TV set near you...

John Self
13th Feb 2006, 13:39
Dispatches (C4 tonight, 8pm) should be interesting, as it's an undercover look at Ryanair, which has long been established as one of the outstanding scumbags of the corporate world: charging (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4647906.stm)passengers for checking in baggage, ordering (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/4343798.stm)blind people off their flights, advertising (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/london/4685703.stm)off the back of the London bombings, banning (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/beds/bucks/herts/4471833.stm)staff from charging their mobile phones on company electricity (!!), going (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4112791.stm)to court to try (unsuccessfully) to avoid having to provide free wheelchairs for disabled passengers, misleading (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/3088311.stm)passengers in adverts (over and over again), making employees pay for their own uniforms, and generally providing (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/2205545.stm)a shit service - to name but a few. That's not to mention charmless boss Michael O'Leary's contempt and arrogance in escapades like buying a taxi licence (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/2815695.stm) so he can use bus lanes. So it will be interesting to see what they uncover tonight, and how it could possibly lower Ryanair any further in the eyes of responsible consumers.

NottyImp
13th Feb 2006, 13:52
Wow, that's some record of corporate scuminess, isn't it?

Miriamaok
13th Feb 2006, 14:04
Wow, that's some record of corporate scuminess, isn't it?

They forgot to mention highjacking your lost property and extorting 10 Euro out of you to get it back.

John Self
13th Feb 2006, 14:09
Quite. Clearly Ryanair is concerned about the programme, as they have published the correspondence between them and the Dispatches team on their website (http://www.ryanair.com/site/EN/inpage.php?partner=DISPATCHES). Allegations against the airline include overworking their staff and pressuring pilots to fly when tired, not servicing the planes properly between flights (including recruits being told they need only check the life jackets were in place under the seats 'if they really wanted to,' and dealing with vomit on the floor by spraying aftershave over it to disguise the smell) and sundry others. Ryanair have responded to the allegations on their website but as they, like us, haven't seen the programme yet, we will have to wait and see if their defences hold water.

Oh, and the amount Ryanair employees have to pay for their uniform is a mere £25 per month ... for the entire duration of their employment.

Daveybot
13th Feb 2006, 15:46
Uh-oh. Looks like I can kiss goodbye any efforts to get some work done over the next couple of weeks: The good ole Beeb is offering up live streaming of their Winter Olympics coverage. As I sit and type this, I must confess that actually I'm watching a very dull round of women's curling.

As far as I can work out, no one has scored yet but the ice is kept nice and clean by both teams' vigorous sweeping tactics. Or something. The sad truth is I don't even care, and yet there it is: I can't stop watching...

...Help me! :-(

John Self
13th Feb 2006, 21:01
Dispatches seemed convincing in its allegations against Ryanair, and brought to our attention yet another example of the airline's up-yours attitude to passengers, when a woman had to take them to court (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/2054215.stm) to enforce a prize of free flights she was awarded for being their millionth customer.

Wavid
13th Feb 2006, 22:28
I was thinking about this on the way home tonight, and to be honest, I'm not really sure I'm all that bothered about Ryanair - and whether they were really ripe for undercover treatment.

Part of it is because they are a business, not an arm of the government offering a public service or something. I mean, if they treat their employees shabbily, then they won't stick around too long which will affect service and then the customers will start to abandon them in greater numbers. Alright, they do some shitty things, but the really shitty stuff will get picked up by the courts and sorted out. In the meantime, they, and the other cut price airlines are probably providing a way for people to travel abroad who might not otherwise have been able to afford to?

In other words, did we really need this programme to tell us that Ryanair were a cruddy company? It was a bit like when they went under cover to prove that the BNP were racists.

Daveybot
13th Feb 2006, 22:48
Mmm, I felt much the same throughout the show - okay, the company are clearly lousy, but I doubt that passenger safety was all that compromised too often. Like the pilots said: 'you pay nothing, you get nothing.' Sure, you might get stuck in the middle of nowhere all night, but did that information really surprise anyone? I've slept in airports before, and frankly the legroom is better than onboard a train.

Now, if aircraft manufacturers were behaving as carelessly then I'd be significantly more worried.

NottyImp
15th Feb 2006, 11:39
Part of it is because they are a business, not an arm of the government offering a public service or something. I mean, if they treat their employees shabbily, then they won't stick around too long which will affect service and then the customers will start to abandon them in greater numbers. Alright, they do some shitty things, but the really shitty stuff will get picked up by the courts and sorted out.

I imagine 19th century workers were told the same by the great and good. Luckily, they worked out how to form unions.

Wavid
15th Feb 2006, 11:44
Well, quite. Go forth, Ryanair workers, and form a union! But as far as decent telly goes, I just don't think the charges against Ryanair made particularly interesting or scandalising watching.

amner
15th Feb 2006, 11:47
Life on Mars, I keep telling you!

Daveybot
15th Feb 2006, 11:56
I've seen trailers for the next Dispatches show - 'Spin on Terror' which I hope will be more interesting. Ever since 'The Power Of Nightmares' was aired, I can't work out why there hasn't been more presentation of the news and politics from this kind of angle...

Edited to add this link (http://www.archive.org/details/ThePowerOfNightmares) to the Internet Archive of the above-mentioned series.

Wavid
15th Feb 2006, 12:04
It's a Peter Oborne one, isn't it? His documentaries are always good value, surprising given that he is a bit of a headbanger. Mind you, the same can be said for Peter Hitchens. Maybe right-wingers just make better programmes?

The recent Boris Johnson one on Rome and Europe is another case in point.

ono no komachi
16th Feb 2006, 10:43
Maybe right-wingers just make better programmes?

I dare you to say that to Alan Bleasdale.

Lucoid
16th Feb 2006, 13:04
But it should be better than K9 and Friends as it's likely to be post-watershed.

I'm not sure that means anything - it's often just an excuse to add in a few swear-words and some gratuitous violence.

amner
17th Feb 2006, 13:35
Uh-oh. Looks like I can kiss goodbye any efforts to get some work done over the next couple of weeks: The good ole Beeb is offering up live streaming of their Winter Olympics coverage. As I sit and type this, I must confess that actually I'm watching a very dull round of women's curling.

As far as I can work out, no one has scored yet but the ice is kept nice and clean by both teams' vigorous sweeping tactics. Or something. The sad truth is I don't even care, and yet there it is: I can't stop watching...

...Help me! :-(
Easily helped, really. Just dismiss anything that isn't a sport. With the Winter Olympics this gets rid of about 95% of everything on 'offer' ("please sir, I don't want any more").

You're basically left with a bit of downhill, ski-jumping and, er, maybe bobsleigh but that's it. I mean, snowboarding, sheesh. These people would be sliding bits of curved plastic off iron rails in your local Arndale centre if some TV exec hadn't decided to grant them a dubious dollop of credibility by terming it a sport and making it 'extreme'. Extremely annoying. Drop the rainbow shades and the baggy trollies and get a job you worthless pieces of scum.

And ice skating; how sporty. What next? In the Summer Olympics (or "The Olympics" as I like to call it) 'having a bit of a bop'? It's just poncing about. On ice.

Feck.

John Self
17th Feb 2006, 13:49
:lol: You're in fine fooling today, master Amner!

amner
17th Feb 2006, 13:52
Just point me at it.

NottyImp
17th Feb 2006, 14:18
And what is that tea-tray downhill stuff about? People spend enormous chunks of their lives doing this, which would be fine if it had about the same status as stamp-collecting.

amner
17th Feb 2006, 14:21
We have a 'new British hero' in tea tray sliding, Notty, don't be so cynical.

I'd be slightly more impressed (well, just impressed) if she brought me a cup of tea right now. I'm gasping. She could whisk the hoover 'round too, this place is in a right two and eight.

ono no komachi
17th Feb 2006, 14:23
She could whisk the hoover 'round too, this place is in a right two and eight.

For that wouldn't you need one of the lasses with the brooms?

Daveybot
17th Feb 2006, 14:32
Yeah, see it's the ice hockey that's pulling me back every time. Two small armies of violent people with sticks and blades trying to beat the crap out of eachother?

I don't care what your other definitions may include, but that's sporty enough for me!

Stewart
17th Feb 2006, 14:42
And what is that tea-tray downhill stuff about? People spend enormous chunks of their lives doing this, which would be fine if it had about the same status as stamp-collecting.

Front cover of the Metro today talked about this. Some woman whinging and complaing that she can't get enough funding to do this "sport". She says it costs her £30,000 a year in order to do it.

A cheaper tea-try may be in order; and find a smoother hill so it doesn't get all scraped so quick.

Wavid
17th Feb 2006, 14:42
I think the extensive use of armour precludes ice hockey from being a sport, doesn't it?

Daveybot
17th Feb 2006, 14:59
I think the extensive use of armour precludes ice hockey from being a sport, doesn't it?

Oh I don't know, I'd happily see jousting back on Sky Sports of a weekend...

John Self
17th Feb 2006, 15:00
The current top story on BBC Sport site is:

Britain's women curlers are struggling against Canada, while the men's sliders prepare for the skeleton.

What? What? Is it just me, or does 'men's sliders' sound like a five-year-old's euphemism for bogies (or worse)?

Wavid
17th Feb 2006, 15:09
Definitely worse!

Digger
17th Feb 2006, 15:47
well all the winter olympic sports are basically sliding, or skidding as Daveybot frequently mentions... ' lets see what skidding is on tonight'

Daveybot
17th Feb 2006, 16:06
I always feel sorry for those dreadfully malady-plagued figure skaters. I mean, imagine having to limp your way onto the ice whilst suffering the terrible pain of a triple sulco, or dreading that visit to the surgeon to remove your double toe lutz.

Poor things.

Miriamaok
26th Feb 2006, 23:51
Anyone watch Gideon's Daughter tonight? I usually find Stephen Poliakoff a bit, how shall I say this, wanky? but I really liked this. I thought it was an interesting period of time to re-examine - the months after Labour's first election victory, the lead up to the Millennium and the Dome and of course the death of Princess Diana. Bill Nighy was wonderful as usual and Miranda Richardson managed to pull of quirky without annoying.

Colyngbourne
27th Feb 2006, 7:52
Well, I enjoyed it but I'm not sure what the point of it was. If there was a point. I could understand the kinds of things that were happening in their various lives but it came across as a depiction of 'those pre- and post-Diana times' rather than anything else. But I suppose that's Poliakoff's strength - he presents life very well to us.

Now, before 9pm on BBC4 there was a very interesting science prog (the first of four) about time and its properties, which I will be watching again. And then, again on BBC4 at 9pm, I recorded for nostalgia's sake (okay, and for an enduring appreciation of Peter Firth 8) ) - the 1980 Play for Today The Flipside of Dominick Hide - which I remember loving at the time and when they repeated it and its sequel a couple of years later, but which 26 years on might turn out to be rubbish.

amner
27th Feb 2006, 8:40
the 1980 Play for Today The Flipside of Dominick Hide - which I remember loving at the time

Bollocks! Out last night (and I didn't know this was one anyway). Fingers crossed for a repeat.

Poliakoff, hmmm. Tend towards Miriamaok's first impressions to be honest. After all, apart from Jodhi May, what was the bloody point of Friends and Crocodiles the other week? He's no Dennis Potter.

Colyngbourne
27th Feb 2006, 9:25
If it turns out to be not absolute rubbish, I'll loan you the video (after we've watched The Crucible which recorded after it - and a tiny bit of Dancing on Ice inbetween).

ono no komachi
28th Feb 2006, 8:46
My favourite bit from last night's Life On Mars:

Gene: I think you've forgotten who you're talking to.
Sam: An overweight, nicotine-stained, homophobic, borderline alcoholic with an unhealthy obsession with male bonding!
Gene: You say that like it's a bad thing!

Wavid
28th Feb 2006, 9:39
There's some good stuff coming up on More4 soon - a season - if that is not too grandiose a term - of three Mike Leigh films, starting with Secrets and Lies.

Surely it will be better than the current run of Nick Broomfield stuff. I can't stand him. Still watched most of His Big White Self last night - though the most interesting bits were either cut from Broomfield's earlier film The Leader, His Driver and the Driver's Wife, or library footage.

amner
28th Feb 2006, 9:42
My favourite bit from last night's Life On Mars:

Gene: I think you've forgotten who you're talking to.
Sam: An overweight, nicotine-stained, homophobic, borderline alcoholic with an unhealthy obsession with male bonding!
Gene: You say that like it's a bad thing!

I was going to quote that self-same passage! Magic stuff, very touching at the end, with genuine resonance (aptly). It's been a top series.

ono no komachi
28th Feb 2006, 10:10
Indeed. I also very much enjoyed Gene's mixed metaphor about little fish wanting to become bigger fish and climb ladders.

The relationship with Annie is very sweet.

Colyngbourne
28th Feb 2006, 10:22
Indeed. I also very much enjoyed Gene's mixed metaphor about little fish wanting to become bigger fish and climb ladders.


I liked that especially.

I was thinking Sam needed an Al to help him fathom out what to do at those history-changing moments (like the other Sam did) but then the series would end perhaps.

amner
28th Feb 2006, 11:39
Goodness, there are some Als who'd be pretty useless trying to help him fathom out what to do at those history-changing moments! ;-)

I've really enjoyed it all, a great ride, which has managed to be funny (very very funny), dark, serious, touching and unsentimental. The only bum note was the awful trailer when they should Sam and his 'morphing' into their 1973 equivalents. Must have put a lot of people off.

As an aside, I sat opposite Sam's mum, Joanna Froggatt on the train a wee while ago. She was gorgeous!

Miriamaok
28th Feb 2006, 12:14
As an aside, I sat opposite Sam's mum, Joanna Froggatt on the train a wee while ago. She was gorgeous!

Ah, now I know who she is. She played bonkers Zoe in Coronation Street years ago. I knew her face was familiar.

Colyngbourne
12th Mar 2006, 7:50
I think a mention of Riot at the Rite deserves a mention here, a depiction of the extreme reactions of the audience to the first performance of The Rite of Spring. Besides the music and dancing (which were superb), all the parts were played with both wit and tension (cameos by Picasso and Cocteau among others, provided some of this): but Alex Jennings as Diagilev, and Aidan McArdle as Stravinsky were the two stand-outs. Surprisingly, although to a modern eye, the dancing and music wasn't *that* extreme, the shock of the new was conveyed enough for me to want to shout at the audience to shut up, and let the dancers do their stuff.

Sammi
12th Mar 2006, 8:10
My favourite bit from last night's Life On Mars:

Gene: I think you've forgotten who you're talking to.
Sam: An overweight, nicotine-stained, homophobic, borderline alcoholic with an unhealthy obsession with male bonding!
Gene: You say that like it's a bad thing!
Cool quote. I looked at the series on www.imdb.com and it looks really cool. I'll have to check it out sometime. I do hope it's not just a Quantum Leap ripoff, and not because I wouldn't like for there to be more Quantum Leapness. It's because nobody but Scott Bakula and Dean Stockwell can be Sam and Al, respectively. (I saw Dean Stockwell in The Langoliers and he was equally awesome.)

Daveybot
19th Apr 2006, 19:25
The Private Life Of An Easter Masterpiece (http://www.tiscali.co.uk/entertainment/tvguide/progdetails.php?regionid=4&chid=16&bd=2006-04-14&bt=19:00) (about a week late)

(http://www.tiscali.co.uk/entertainment/tvguide/progdetails.php?regionid=4&chid=16&bd=2006-04-14&bt=19:00)http://www.heureka.clara.net/books/dali-crossofstjohn.jpg
(http://www.revilo-oliver.com/Kevin-Strom-personal/Art/Dali_ChristofStJohnoftheCross1951.JPG)
Did anyone else see this? I believe there were three shows looking at three different paintings, but I only got to see the one about this number above: The Christ of St John Of The Cross, by good old Salvador Dali. Generally I'm not too fussed about Dali - like him well enough I guess, but this particular painting is a favourite. I even once went to Glasgow just to see it.

The show itself was sober but in-depth, and gave a really interesting insight into the painting and its history. I'd always loved the composition and perspective found in it, but was fascinated to learn who this St. John Of The Cross was, how Dali borrowed hunky hollywood actors to do the modelling, and most of all how the composition was derived from the artist's fascination with the recently-popularised atomic nature of matter. It was also interesting to hear of how unpopular the painting was when it made its way to Glasgow, and how the city actually bought the copyright off the artist!

Did anyone else see it or any of the other shows? What were they like?

I'd meant to post this a while ago but forgot. However, this article (http://cutnspray.com/cnsblog/wordpress/?page_id=29) in one of my regular reads reminded me of the show. As a stenciller myself, I've got to say that (http://www.cutnspray.com/site/images/maya_1/picks/Dali-Jesus-01.jpg)'s some impressived work!

ono no komachi
20th Apr 2006, 9:10
I saw most of the Dali one; had also seen the preceding one on The Last Supper (to quote the Guardian's TV review, "Dan Brown got a kicking, so that was good") which was fabulous.

The third one was on Pierro della Francesca's The Resurrection, which I watched for about twenty minutes and then got bored with (though still vaguely interested why Christ resurrected is represented with what looks like a flag of St. George, maybe if my concentration hadn't lapsed I would have found out) - that one felt to me as though they were struggling to find interesting things to say about it.

Going back to the Dali episode, one question I did find interesting was whether Dali's finally revealed lack of faith detracted from the value of the painting as a work of art. It was nice to see points of view on both sides of this argument.

I was a huge fan of Dali in my adolescence (not very original, I know).

Colyngbourne
20th Apr 2006, 9:41
I watched all three of these: the last one was less riveting than the previous two and seemed to repeat various comments and spend a lot of time with the camera panning on the picture. That said, it was generally excellent viewing and I enjoyed the anti-Dan Brownism that the first programme managed to include. I also caught the last of Brian Sewell's Grand Tour programmes, which was rather moving ultimately.

Colyngbourne
7th Jun 2006, 7:45
Fantastic profile of Tom Heatherwick last night on Yentob's Imagine. Maybe Terence Conran's elevating him to the ranks of Da Vinci (the man, not The Code) was a trifle OTT, but what was not to like about his work! The bridge that rolled up like a caterpillar until it became a hexagonal (octagonal?) nut - I want one! The shapes, the ingenuity that made sense, not just startling beauty, the engineering. the holistic approach - and a genuinely nice bloke.

I know his dad so it was good to see him interviewed as well (though too briefly).

Is he on your list of approvables, Daveybot?

Daveybot
7th Jun 2006, 11:13
Oh very much so. I think you're right: the comparison to Da Vinci is a bit too far, but certainly the Biggest Big Banging Big Bang (or whatever it's called) and the roll-up bridge are lovely.

...Actually, the practice represented in the office downstairs from ours did the engineering for that bridge. Anthony Hunt Associates, they were, but have recently been absorbed into what is, I think, an Australian Hyper Global Mega Omni Corp. The old AHA website is now dead, and I can't remember their new uber-name to direct people. Nevertheless they've done lots of lovely and clever engineering, that bridge being one of their little efforts. I think Arups did the Big Splat, though I may be wrong.

But it now becomes clear that I blather at meaningless tangents. You're right Col: Heatherwick seems a top talent. WIsh I'd seen the show.

NottyImp
7th Jun 2006, 12:44
I have now been without a telly in the house for two months. Don't miss it a bit.

Wavid
7th Jun 2006, 13:46
But but but but Notty - the World Cup starts on Friday!

HP
7th Jun 2006, 14:24
Another damn good reason for ditching the telly then .... ;-)

NottyImp
7th Jun 2006, 15:16
But but but but Notty - the World Cup starts on Friday!


Lucky that I like the odd pint down the local, then. ;-)

Another damn good reason for ditching the telly then ....


Tsk. Surely you want to see the denouement of Wayne Rooney's Foot?

Stewart
7th Jun 2006, 15:18
Tsk. Surely you want to see the denouement of Wayne Rooney's Foot?

We most certainly do up here! :-x

But how would you know about this whole rigmarole if you did not have a telly? Burn the witch! :roll:

NottyImp
7th Jun 2006, 15:20
But how would you know about this whole rigmarole if you did not have a telly? Burn the witch!

Telly is not the only medium. And there is no medium free of that particular saga, is there?

I just got Angola in the office World Cup sweepstake. Two bloody quid to enter, as well.

amner
7th Jun 2006, 16:59
So you'll be looking forward to their match against Portugal then? Political tensions a go-go, eh? Should be a bloodbath.

JunkMonkey
7th Jun 2006, 17:18
Who's Wayne Rooney?

amner
7th Jun 2006, 17:19
...and there I was trying to steer it away from football!

HP
7th Jun 2006, 18:08
Tsk. Surely you want to see the denouement of Wayne Rooney's Foot?

'Fraid I couldn't give an arse about his foot, his thigh, his pug nose or any other part of the unlovely lad's anatomy. The last time I saw any footie on the box, Brazil were knocking seven shades of hell out of our clodhoppers. It was a triumph of grace and skill and sublime talent against petulant three-legged tabloid-fodder-preening posers. And as for admonishing me with a 'tsk' - just what the bejesus is a tsk when it's at home, Notty?! Have never heard anyone who ever drew breath say such a daft thing in real life - so why use it at all? Answer me that, you self-professed ancient anarchist, you!

NottyImp
8th Jun 2006, 12:52
So you'll be looking forward to their match against Portugal then? Political tensions a go-go, eh? Should be a bloodbath.


Yes, some interesting history there, I believe. Actually, I'm probably only bothering with the Ing-ger-land matches, to be honest.

And as for admonishing me with a 'tsk' - just what the bejesus is a tsk when it's at home, Notty?! Have never heard anyone who ever drew breath say such a daft thing in real life - so why use it at all? Answer me that, you self-professed ancient anarchist, you!


Blimey. :shock:

amner
8th Jun 2006, 13:42
I'd stick to Portugal-Angola relations, Notty. Less of a minefield, mate.

Daveybot
8th Jun 2006, 13:49
So you'll be looking forward to their match against Portugal then? Political tensions a go-go, eh? Should be a bloodbath.

I've drawn Portugal in the office sweepstakes, so will be watching closely. I'm also supporting Croatia this year because I like their tennis players. And Trinidad and Tobago, of course, because I'll be in Scotland.

...Oh and why not. England too. You can tell I'm a proper football fan. To be honest my main area of interest will be the stadiums themselves. The new Hedgehog & The Moron one (http://www.flickr.com/photos/tags/hedgehogthemoron/) in Munich is an absolute corker.

NottyImp
8th Jun 2006, 14:18
To be honest my main area of interest will be the stadiums themselves.

You should check out the St. Andrews (Echo) stand at Sincil Bank, mate. And then design something to replace it.

I'd stick to Portugal-Angola relations, Notty. Less of a minefield, mate.


I bow to your superior knowledge. ;)

m.
9th Jun 2006, 7:30
My mum shocked me yesterday when she told me the World Cup starts today and we are even playing - Ecuador or something? I've got to say that my interest in football was maybe greatest during the WC in Barcelona, so when I was really young, and then rather declined. And local patriotism doesn't help to spark it either, cause for a couple of years my city has been more into basket than football (though a chain of the National Championships won seems to have come to an end...) Well I don't have tv at my place so I'm a sports ignorant, but I don't mind watching football generally, so may see some while visiting my parents or brother.

Colyngbourne
9th Jun 2006, 8:22
A plea, as the happy/tedious competition begins, not to let the Decent Telly thread be subsumed by football-ese (and go to Goal Mouths (http://www.goalmouths.com/) instead...) ;-)

m.
9th Jun 2006, 8:32
:oops: Sorry! But that was my first and in all probability last post on the subject - I really don't have much to say. ;-)

HP
9th Jun 2006, 8:33
I'd stick to Portugal-Angola relations, Notty. Less of a minefield, mate.

Tsk tsk amner .... was only joshing (though I still don't understand the use of tsk tsk whojit thingy).

And Col .... eeh, what a fabulous suggestion: thou art the voice of sweet reason and wisdom! Prayers be answered that footie fanatics take your advice.

Digger
9th Jun 2006, 14:37
I just watched the downloaded double bill finale of LOST season two.... woo-hoo, :-D wow, so many questions, namely when is series 3!!

Who knows whether anyone else apart from the DiggerBot is watching this but I've loved season two.

jim
9th Jun 2006, 14:55
I'm watching it too! So what happens??? No - don't tell me.

ono no komachi
9th Jun 2006, 15:02
I'm kind of keeping half an eye on it as well...usually the Sunday evening repeats when I'm fed up of gardening and housework and just ready for a bit of mindless entertainment (and gazing at Sawyer's chest...)

I've missed some bits though... Has Charlie succumbed to the contents of the plaster madonnas and become an addict again?

Digger
9th Jun 2006, 15:25
tee hee! IknowIknowIknow! now, that's just mean of me, and I apologise.... a bit.

Praise the Bot and his downloading skills. We know what happens when you don't press the button....

ono no komachi
9th Jun 2006, 15:50
I was lining up with Jack on the not pressing the button thing. I did enjoy how they were so blatant about Jack being the man of science and not taking anything on faith and Locke being the spiritual guy who was convinced they had to take the word as it was handed down to them...

*sigh* and to think I wasn't even going to watch season 2. Then the SO, who is normally oblivious of things like TV schedules (and quite rightly so) muttered oh-so-casually about it being time for the first episode of the next series, and were we going to tape it? So now I'm sucked in for another gazillion weeks, or however long it is...

jim
9th Jun 2006, 16:26
I want to know what happens when you don't press it!

It's even more exciting than the equally preposterous Prison Break which doesn't start again til next year!

Paul
9th Jun 2006, 18:19
After the finale all I know is it's going to be a long wait until next season!

edit: by the way, how long is the delay on American TV in the UK?

Daveybot
9th Jun 2006, 22:31
Praise the Bot and his downloading skills.
I've no idea what she's talking about...

The problem - okay, one of the problems - with Lost is that even if we were to tell you the answers to your questions they wouldn't make any sense to you. Heck, they don't make that much sense to us! Still, I guess clarity and rationality is not the attraction of this show really...

Oh and Paul, I think the rest of the UK here are about eighteen or nineteen episodes behind the American audience.

Digger
20th Jun 2006, 15:36
Watched Naill Fuguson's The War of the World last night. Very jumpy about and slightly confusing but I liked it all the same. I like having my historical overviews refreshed every now and again. Will probably watch part two, see if the grand scheme of things makes any more sense then.

Noumenon
16th Jul 2006, 1:21
More 4 showed a three part documentary called "The Pervert's Guide To Cinema" that was excellent. A refreshingly unusual presenter in the form of Slovenian philosopher and psycho-somethingist Slavoj Zizek rambles his way through Hitchcock, Lynch, The Conversation, The Matrix and more, only to come across as a genius instead of a pervert.

Apart from when he announces that children should be denied access to flowers because "they are all open, inviting any insect to come and screw them" (the flowers, not the children). I apologise for alerting anybody after the fact, but I've only been Palimpsestuous for a few days.

Digger
16th Jul 2006, 11:49
Welcome Noumenon, have fun in Palimpland, it's great here. You might want to think about finding a new avatar though, Hazelweller might feel she has an unexpected twin!

gil
25th Jul 2006, 10:59
Has anyone been watching the latest series of Silent Witness? Somehow, they are much better filmed and scripted than ever before. Partly it's the lazy scenes where victims and those surrounding them are seen before their demise, but mostly I think it's the fact that it is no longer a sort of soap opera built around Amanda Burton, but a drama about the corpses and their relatives and friends.

(In case anyone is becoming puzzled at the mordant tone of this piece, I should say that it is based in a mortuary and that the stories are mostly detective stories founded in forensic pathology).

Colyngbourne
25th Jul 2006, 11:11
I've been watching them and approve of the non-Amanda-Burton-ness (more Harry and Leo, please!) but some of the police/forensic pathologist interaction has been more corny this series. And Nikki is just annoying and over-involved in all her cases. I liked the mix of 'ordinary' cases this weekend but there was too much moony music and over-protracted scenes of mourning.

amner
25th Jul 2006, 11:15
How odd. Was just going to mention this.

I used to keep an eye on Silent Witness because it used to have a strong Cambridge connection and, some years ago now, one very long scene was filmed over a week in the village I was living in at the time.

Like gil and Col I grew tired of Amanda Burton and let it drift, but have picked up this series and it's really very very good. The opening sequence of Sunday's episode - no violence or grim scenes, just a series of slo-mo silent vignettes picking out some of the dramatis personae - was rivetting.

Crime dramas tend to lose their grip on your better senses when they inevitably drift away from the personal and forget about the people left behind, concentrating on the predicatble 'thrilling' chasing down of some evasive perpetrator, but so far Silent Witness has managed to remind the viewer that, as Clarence the Angel said, "each man's life touches so many other lives. When he isn't around he leaves an awful hole". It's serious and very sombre, but then, it should be.

Well done them.

gil
25th Jul 2006, 11:23
some of the police/forensic pathologist interaction has been more corny this series. And Nikki is just annoying and over-involved in all her casesThe police/forensic pathologist interaction is unrealistic, I should say. I am sure that neither get so deeply involved in each others' business in real life! But I have been enjoying that aspect.
too much moony music and over-protracted scenes of mourningIn a way, that's what, like Amner, I'm saying - you see more of the hole in people's lives, rather than just the meat on the slab or the pathologists' personal lives.

Colyngbourne
25th Jul 2006, 12:04
In a way, that's what, like Amner, I'm saying - you see more of the hole in people's lives, rather than just the meat on the slab or the pathologists' personal lives.

That is true - I think it's just the music I don't like! The randomness of lives lost was very effectively put across in these last two episodes.

Stewart
25th Jul 2006, 12:35
Going back to Lost, I watched the season finale of Lost back in May and it's one of the only TV shows that I tune (well, download a torrent of) regularly. That and Doctor Who. Oh, and Tribe.

gil
25th Jul 2006, 13:48
Blixa, you have just listed three of the programmes I am least likely to watch! Of course, I come from Edinburgh, originally, so I suppose you'd expect a culture clash.

Digger
26th Jul 2006, 13:08
I am loving free Film4, although so far I've been so dog-tired at the end of the day that I haven't managed to make it through a full film!

Daveybot
26th Jul 2006, 14:01
I watched some of good ole Fifth Element the other night, but have sadly been in the office every evening since then and only been getting home about 11:00. Bleugh. Though I can't say I'm actually enjoying having free Film4, I can say I enjoy knowing it's there.

...And that I absolutely loved the site of Dame Judi Dench and Ewan MacGregor dressed as lobster and tomato outside the national Gallery - joy.

Stewart
26th Jul 2006, 14:03
I liked Film Four when it moved to four channels: Film Four, Film Four + 1, Film Four World, and Film Four Extreme. I usually watched Film Four World - it's how I discovered my favourite film, Last Year In Marienbad.

Then, the bastards changed it to Film Four, Film Four +1, and Film Four Weekly, which showed the same movies every night so you had seven chances not to miss the movies.

I've not been back since, but since it's free...

amner
26th Jul 2006, 14:08
Road to Perdition is on this Thursday; other than that it's not been a stupendously attractive first week, but I expect it'll pick up. It used to be the movie channel I'd covet most readily when reading the listings.

Digger
26th Jul 2006, 14:21
I suspect it's a channel that looks excellent in the preview ads and then, once it arrives, has to be carefully selected through, but as with you amner, I coveted it and now have it and am therefore feeling satisfied!

Lucoid
26th Jul 2006, 14:24
Though I can't say I'm actually enjoying having free Film4, I can say I enjoy knowing it's there.

I'm of a similar opinion as you, DB, but for different reasons - our Freeview signal's playing up again, just after we thought we'd fixed it for good. Very very annoying!

John Self
26th Jul 2006, 14:27
We'll be watching Zoolander on Film4 tonight, which I've been wanting to see for ages, though not actually enough to pay for it...

amner
26th Jul 2006, 14:48
Christ but we're a difficult-to-please bunch of sourpusses, in't we?

Digger
26th Jul 2006, 14:57
no point in being easy!

Miriamaok
26th Jul 2006, 16:37
I'm quite interested to see Festival (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0468736/) about the Edinburgh Festival. It's written and directed by Annie Griffen who also did The Book Group. I remember reading about it when it was released to very lukewarm reviews. It's on tonight at 11pm if I can stay awake that long.

Daveybot
26th Jul 2006, 19:29
I absolutely love Festival. I've seen it now three times, two of those at the cinema. However, I can safely say that it's not for everyone. I myself was often rolling around with laughter - particularly during the 'critics' scenes, but I know my cousin for one had problems with scenes of, for instance, puppeteers being fisted.

The main reason I liked it was I was about to leave Edinburgh at the time and I was going to be missing it. You can tell I'm not a local, you see, because I actually really enjoy Edinburgh's festival season. my office is about four yards off the Royal Mile and most of the film is shot in places I know and love well. The City Cafe, the Cafe Royal, Armstrongs, The Meadows, and so on and so forth.

Basically a film that moved me to tears of laughter and nostalgia, and had many others I know reaching for the sick bag and reeling in absolute disgust, or at the very least not laughing a single bit. It's rusty round the edges, sure, but it still made me grin.

Watch with care, folks!

gil
27th Jul 2006, 7:46
Free? Film4 is free, now? Why wasn't I told?

Colyngbourne
27th Jul 2006, 7:55
Check out the previous page.
It was only free as of last Sunday. I'm thinking they're probably going to show the more commercially popular films (I was hoping they'd still show Cocteau's Orphee and La Belle et La Bete as they have done the last couple of years) - though I am pleased they're doing a Miyazaki season from next week on (*must set video for when on holiday*).

gil
27th Jul 2006, 8:12
Thanks, Col. The thing is, we've got Sky Movies (at vast expense), but whenever we scan the listings, it's something on Film4 that we fancy, and, of course, we've learned not to click on that because all we used to get was an invitation to spend more money. Now it's free, I suppose we will never again find anything we want to watch. That's people for you.

Digger
27th Jul 2006, 8:31
Freeview channel 31 Gil.

JS, what did you think of Zoolander last night - I only got about an hour in before nodding off (not through boredom particularly just exhaustion).

John Self
27th Jul 2006, 8:56
I thought it wasn't bad, Digger - very funny in places and not so funny in others. If you nodded off about an hour in, then you only missed about 20 minutes! ***00 overall.

Digger
27th Jul 2006, 9:00
wow, a shortie. The bits I saw alternately made me laugh and cringe. The walk off was very silly, and the mispronouncing of eulogie and other things (sp?) made me giggle.

Hekaterine
27th Jul 2006, 10:41
I have to admit to being fascinated by the telly threads, even though I don't own one.

Not convinced I'm really missing anything though.

John Self
27th Jul 2006, 11:14
I think kumquat joins you in that merry band, Hekaterine.

I've always wondered about not owning a telly, though. Did you never have one, or did you have one and get rid of it? I can't see myself ever choosing not to have one, just as I wouldn't choose to remove all access to books, music, films or any other creative medium.

amner
27th Jul 2006, 12:37
Dido doesn't own a telly either.

Stewart
27th Jul 2006, 12:47
I have a telly but in the last few years my use of it has dwindled to a select few programmes. I read the TV listings and if anything interests then I watch it. I don't sit down to an evening in front of the telly.

That said, I watched Rob Brydon's Annually Retentive the other night on a whim. I'm not usually a fan of him (or Coogan, for that matter) but it was entertaining enough and showed these annoying celebrity based panel shows for what we all know they are: scripted tat.

Highlights were all the behind the scenes parts as opposed to the actual game show interspersed.

Lucoid
27th Jul 2006, 14:05
Did anyone see the oddly titled Shiny Shiny Bright New Hole in My Heart last night? I sort of did (Mum phoned part-way through so I watched the middle bit with the sound down) and quite enjoyed it. Apparently a lot of it was improvised but I didn't read this in the RT until after seeing it, and it must have been effective as I didn't notice (except for the scene in the shopping addiction support group towards the end).

I think the Beeb should do more of these one-off dramas in the evenings, as they make a nice counterbalance to all the longer-running series, soaps and house buying/renovating/decorating programmes that dominate the schedules.

PS I grew up without a telly - we didn't get one until I was about 12. I've been addicted ever since, but am thankful for the tv-free beginnings that gave me time to fall in love with the world of books. I've also found I'm relatively immune to TV advertising, which is nice.

Hekaterine
27th Jul 2006, 14:23
I went for years without a telly when I was younger (mostly whilst living abroad) and didn't miss it at all. Have had one until recently for my son but he's now 19 and, although he technically lives at home, he has his own space on the top floor of my house. He has a telly in his sitting room which I would theoretically be able to watch or use to watch a DVD on but I don't feel the need.

Interestingly, Lucoid, my son didn't even see a TV set until he was 13 months old and was fascinated by it. Then when we came to the UK when he was 2, he was totally glued to my dad's TV and acquired an addiction to game shows!

Digger
27th Jul 2006, 14:23
I remember several childhood years without a TV, and lots of years with a very small black and white tv and heavy parental tv-time management. We were never allowed tvs in our rooms - something that none of us really minded, we had books and lego instead.

I have several TV favourites now, mostly very silly series in which I can disengage my brain for an hour or so, some funnies - mainly the Simpsons - C4 news with Mr Snow and movies, but missing any one of them doesn't ruin my day.

Colyngbourne
27th Jul 2006, 15:16
Neither we nor our own kids have TV's in their bedrooms. Our TV is used more for film watching than TV programmes. There are programmes that will always draw our interest - Dr Who, Spooks, some documentaries and things like Jools Holland and QI; a daily dose of Neighbours has provided light relief for the last twenty years, and daily news is very important - though the style and depth of this is becoming worryingly shallow. Of all this, I think the news is the most important - but I don't mind through which medium I get it. I would find the lack of a daily newspaper a stressful thing - we always just about manage to find one when we're on hols.

amarie
27th Jul 2006, 16:22
Did anyone see the oddly titled Shiny Shiny Bright New Hole in My Heart last night? I sort of did (Mum phoned part-way through so I watched the middle bit with the sound down) and quite enjoyed it. Apparently a lot of it was improvised but I didn't read this in the RT until after seeing it, and it must have been effective as I didn't notice (except for the scene in the shopping addiction support group towards the end).

I did see most of this but my Mum also 'phoned right in the middle of it! It was good to have something different from the usual rubbish that's on the telly,and I did enjoy it. I thought the main character (can't remember her name) portrayed the growing desperation of her situation really well, particulary after one enourmous binge with her wealthy friend/employer (also can't remember her name) when she was casting around for one last thing to buy.

We didn't have much telly time as kids at all which I'm convinced led to a love of reading from a very early age. I do have a telly now but during the summer months it barely gets switched on as I hate being inside when the weather's good. Plus there's so much to do in the garden there's no time for TV. I do watch the news, but like Col I find the style so horribly sensationalist and just flimsy that I'd rather wait until I come to work and either buy a newspaper or look at the BBC webpages.

jim
28th Jul 2006, 8:57
Other than films I think the only things I watch now are sport and Lost. I probably watch a lot more in the winter.

We have never really had any rules as far as the kids are concerned and of my three, my son is quite a keen TV watcher whereas my two girls are completely uninterested. I think our influence on our children's likes and dislikes is far less than we perhaps think.

Noumenon
2nd Aug 2006, 2:28
BBC4 showed a 1971 documentary tonight called Town Bloody Hall, in which Norman Mailer, Germaine Greer and other "friends" briefly discussed the feminist movement in between spirited interruptions and arguments with each other and the audience. It was very entertaining I thought, although I haven't read either of them (nor the other panel members, whose names I forget). Mailer and Greer would have made good contestants for a feminist Celebrity Death Match. Along with Jordan.

I prepared for the experience by grinding my teeth down to the gums courtesy of the last half of Notting Hill, which I hated the first time around and have now found to stand the test of time. I still hate it.

gil
2nd Aug 2006, 9:56
Beryl and I both fell asleep at the end of Silent Witness this week. Anyone know what happened, specifically?:

We know the boy was the industrialist's son by his stepdaughter, but who shot him?

What was the deal about the dead artist?

amner
2nd Aug 2006, 12:02
Probably watch both eps tonight, gil, so will report back tomorrow.

wshaw
5th Aug 2006, 7:41
I've been enjoyiing Sinchronicity ( http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbcthree/sinchronicity/index.shtml), despite the title.

Stewart
18th Aug 2006, 15:34
Dispatches (C4 tonight, 8pm) should be interesting, as it's an undercover look at Ryanair, which has long been established as one of the outstanding scumbags of the corporate world: charging (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4647906.stm)passengers for checking in baggage, ordering (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/4343798.stm)blind people off their flights, advertising (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/london/4685703.stm)off the back of the London bombings, banning (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/beds/bucks/herts/4471833.stm)staff from charging their mobile phones on company electricity (!!), going (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4112791.stm)to court to try (unsuccessfully) to avoid having to provide free wheelchairs for disabled passengers, misleading (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/3088311.stm)passengers in adverts (over and over again), making employees pay for their own uniforms, and generally providing (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/2205545.stm)a shit service - to name but a few. That's not to mention charmless boss Michael O'Leary's contempt and arrogance in escapades like buying a taxi licence (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/2815695.stm) so he can use bus lanes. So it will be interesting to see what they uncover tonight, and how it could possibly lower Ryanair any further in the eyes of responsible consumers.

Ryanair in the news (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/5261908.stm) again. This time they are threatening to sue the government because they want to have less luggage in their holds since people are currently restricted in the interests of safety.

John Self
18th Aug 2006, 15:36
Yes I read that and meant to post something about it. Nothing is beneath that scumbag Michael O'Leary.

amner
18th Aug 2006, 15:49
He's on R5Live all the time at the moment, whining about one thing or another. He really is most tiresome.

Stewart
25th Aug 2006, 11:09
Well, here (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/5285102.stm) he goes.

Colyngbourne
25th Aug 2006, 11:13
Recently we've been enjoying (not exactly the right word) Bruce Parry's Antarctic trek... and also How Do You Solve A Problem Like Maria?

amner
25th Aug 2006, 11:21
... and also How Do You Solve A Problem Like Maria?

Absolutely nothing wrong with that, Col. Even though Bonnie, sorry Connie (what am I thinking?), will win, Abi's the one to support. Mmmm...Abi.

John Self
25th Aug 2006, 11:27
Ooh no - 'eyebrows' Abi? Call me a man of simple tastes, but I'm a Siobhan/Meliz man myself. Though we couldn't believe Simona didn't get voted off last week for that dreadful rendition of Material Girl. And what the hell were the judges complaining about last week with Aoife's incredible - best in show - performance of If They Could See Me Now?

amner
25th Aug 2006, 11:30
Yes, Material Girl. What was that all about?

Colyngbourne
25th Aug 2006, 11:41
We're voting for Connie, followed by Aoife, I think. They were good at both the singing and the acting. Siobhan reminds me awfully (in the worst sense) of Nina Tucker/Delta Goodrem from Neighbours.

Meliz can't sing long loud sustained stuff without her face going all agonised and emoting high angst (similar with the girl who is a real miserable-looking chops). Leanne is good but too young. But with Abi, I think AL-W got it right when he said she was a character singer/actress.

Stewart
25th Aug 2006, 11:53
Aoife? How do you actually say that?

Colyngbourne
25th Aug 2006, 11:57
Eefa, kind of.

John Self
25th Aug 2006, 12:00
similar with the girl who is a real miserable-looking chops

Ooh, you mean Helena? Yes, she should really have gone in week 1 for that toe-curling performance of Crazy Chick. That face she pulled when singing "I need professional help" is still a running joke round our way. And yes, the basic problem for her, poor girl, is that her face in its natural repose looks miserable - everything downturned - and that ain't no Maria style.

We hated Connie to begin with - something too keen and desperately eager about her, plus she's a professional isn't she, oh and she looks about ten years older than she is (23) - but she was terrific last week doing Shout. She could certainly do the gig.

Yes Leanne is definitely too young. Simona - sorry - is too Romanian. (And I see she's current favourite to be knocked out this week in the online poll on the Maria homepage (http://www.bbc.co.uk/maria/index.shtml).) You're probably right about Meliz, Col, and Siobhan I don't think has the right look or indeed the range, but they're awfully easy on the eye. Aoife it probably is then, or Connie.

(Just looking at their pages on the website, you've got to love the mixture of truth and optimism in their job descriptions. "Performer and waitress." "Actress and telesales." "Actress/receptionist.")

And you've got to admire the work the girls put in every week, compared with something like The X Factor. They have to do two choreographed routines together (at the start and then at the interval), their solo song, learn the play-off song each week, plus of course do Goodbye, Farewell, Auf Wiedersehen on top of that (which is a touch of genius in itself - whose idea was that then?).

EDIT: Yes, it's Eefa, exactly. My brother-in-law's sister (sister-in-law?) rejoices in that name.

Stewart
25th Aug 2006, 12:08
In fairness to The X Factor, the first few weeks are entertaining as we get to see the deluded people of Glasgow, Manchester, London, Birmingham, and a few other places. The looks on some of their faces when they are told they can't sing is priceless. Then they pick some knobs who can sing and the show goes downhill into pantomime territory.

Colyngbourne
25th Aug 2006, 12:15
And you've got to admire the work the girls put in every week, compared with something like The X Factor. They have to do two choreographed routines together (at the start and then at the interval), their solo song, learn the play-off song each week, plus of course do Goodbye, Farewell, Auf Wiedersehen on top of that (which is a touch of genius in itself - whose idea was that then?).


I'm impressed by the general quality of singing going on, too. And there are no punches pulled on the show, and thankfully, the audience haven't gone for that wholehearted booing at the (usually) accurate criticisms of the panel, and were somewhat reprimanded for being too noisy, when Abi (I think) couldn't hear her backing music.

And the ending is brutal. I get something in my eye every week when they do their farewells.

amner
25th Aug 2006, 12:20
the first few weeks are entertaining as we get to see the deluded people of Glasgow, Manchester, London, Birmingham, and a few other places. The looks on some of their faces when they are told they can't sing is priceless. Then they pick some knobs who can sing and the show goes downhill into pantomime territory.

This should be weekly prog ident for The X Factor when you press 'i' for a description. Perfect.

John Self
25th Aug 2006, 12:45
Oh yes, I'm certainly not knocking the first few weeks of The X Factor. That whole (to paraphrase Charlie Brooker) parading borderline mentally ill people before us like performing bears thing, really appeals to my base instincts. The All Night Long man! The Like a Prayer woman! I haven't laughed so much in ages.

But when oh when will people applying for these shows remember that almost none of the winners is successful? Have a look at this list:

Popstars : Hear'Say

Popstars The Rivals : Girls Aloud / One True Voice

Pop Idol : Gareth Gates

Pop Idol 2 : Michelle McManus

The X Factor : Steve Brookstein

The X Factor 2 : Shayne Warde

Fame Academy : David Sneddon

Fame Academy 2 : Alex Parks

Eight of whom are currently residing in the Where Are They Now? file. I mean, one out of nine? Do you really like them odds?

Stewart
25th Aug 2006, 14:08
Pop Idol 2 : Michelle McManus

Where Are They Now?

I can answer that one. She's hanging about on the south of Glasgow. Saw her in my local one night. Friend of a friend of a friend.

Colyngbourne
25th Aug 2006, 16:38
But when oh when will people applying for these shows remember that almost none of the winners is successful? Have a look at this list:


But Will Young (the first and best, and not mentioned in this list) is still doing well. And I buy his albums :-D

John Self
25th Aug 2006, 16:44
Oops, you're completely right! I got confused and thought Gareth Gates was the winner and Will Young the runner up (probably because that's what everyone expected at the time). 2 out of 9 it is!

HP
25th Aug 2006, 17:00
Will Young can indeed sing - and his grin and chin deserve a round of applause on their own accounts - but oh what a prissy bore he is when interviewed! And since listening to his witless, priggish spoken chirpings, I can't enjoy his music any more. He's obviously sensible and well-meaning and unlikely to smash a guitar or snog a frog or be found half-comatose with a needle in his arm, but there's 'nice likeable' and 'nice irritating'. He's very much the latter, in my book.

ono no komachi
25th Aug 2006, 17:11
Crikey, HP, if I stopped listening to artists who are less than riveting, or aren't particularly likable in conversation, I'd have to throw out half my record collection!

I often find the same things with actors whose performances I enjoy too, so often the characters they play are much more charismatic/interesting/appealing than the real thing.

Will Young is, I think, a rare genuine talent to have come out of those shows. My objection to him is more that I don't particularly enjoy his style (he seems to indulge a lot in an overly ornamented style much beloved of many R&B - in the modern sense - artists). And his/his record label's choice of songs is too often trite and forgettable, IMHO.

HP
25th Aug 2006, 17:24
Crikey, HP, if I stopped listening to artists who are less than riveting, or aren't particularly likable in conversation, I'd have to throw out half my record collection!


True. Except with others I can forgive them their spoken trespasses, if their music hits the mark well enough. But his doesn't and I can't.

I often find the same things with actors whose performances I enjoy too, so often the characters they play are much more charismatic/interesting/appealing than the real thing.

Also true. Take Julia Roberts - I mean yes, please do - cos I can't stand her. Another one whose interview babblings are so infuriatingly dull and pretentious and tainted with the importance of being Julia, that I can't abide watching her in any role now. Her presence is reason enough to give a film a wide berth no matter how good the reviews. Russell Crowe is one of the exceptions to this rule, however. He's got an ego the size of Africa and is a thug of the first order, but he's just so immensely watchable - and believable - whatever role he takes on ... so he's forgiven! And no - don't fancy him in the slightest - knowing what he's like in RL scuppers that possibility.


Will Young is, I think, a rare genuine talent to have come out of those shows. My objection to him is more that I don't particularly enjoy his style (he seems to indulge a lot in an overly ornamented style much beloved of many R&B - in the modern sense - artists). And his/his record label's choice of songs is too often trite and forgettable, IMHO.


Yes, very, very true - all of it.

ono no komachi
25th Aug 2006, 17:42
Russell Crowe is one of the exceptions to this rule, however. He's got an ego the size of Africa and is a thug of the first order, but he's just so immensely watchable - and believable - whatever role he takes on ... so he's forgiven! And no - don't fancy him in the slightest - knowing what he's like in RL scuppers that possibility.

I have a similar thing with Tom Cruise, almost to the point where I will go and see one of his films regardless of reviews (except even I baulked at War of the Worlds). Sometimes I wonder if he really can be that crazy and I usually end up concluding that yes, he probably is.

John Self
26th Aug 2006, 20:59
And so back to How Do You Solve A Problem Like Maria? For a change I'm at home on Saturday night between the two shows, so my predictions for bottom two this week are Meliz (fantastically sexy still - though better without all that shimmery slap on - but her performance of Girls Just Wanna Have Fun was awful) and Simona (Ay Only Vont To Pee Vith Yo is just not the sort of thing Dusty Springfield would have sung, plus the public hate a prima donna). Or possible Leanne, who was terribly out of her depth doing 9 to 5.

Performance of the night, without a doubt, was Abi's Big Spender. I suspect amner is lying down right now with a cold flannel. She's still no Maria though.

Aoife for winner! She's incredibly beautiful, a great performer and apparently can act too. My only concern is people texting in might not spell her name right and the computer system won't count their votes...

John Self
26th Aug 2006, 23:03
Well, so long, farewell, etc. Meliz! Next stop FHM? (She was better than Helena in the sing-off, though. Helena's face seems to melt further each week.)

kumquat
27th Aug 2006, 0:18
i asked mini-me how he would feel about doing without telly. i expected uproar. he shrugged his shoulders (once he knew this would not mean foregoing playstation) and said he wasn't bothered!

wonderful. i've pulled out the aerial thingy and now i don't have to pretend i keep missing things on the telly. i actually don't pay my license nor watch the bally thing.

JunkMonkey
27th Aug 2006, 3:12
Take Julia Roberts - I mean yes, please do - cos I can't stand her. Another one whose interview babblings are so infuriatingly dull and pretentious and tainted with the importance of being Julia, that I can't abide watching her in any role now. Her presence is reason enough to give a film a wide berth no matter how good the reviews.
As good a reason as I have come across for eschewing the whole Celeb Culture thing. All actors are liars. It's the job. For me their ability to do their job requires that I know as little as possible about them in 'real life', that way I have fewer obsticles to accepting what they say in character as being some sort of truth. This is why I like films populated with actors I have never heard of before. They don't bring buckets full of well know preconcieved notions to their parts.


(bucketfuls?)

Stewart
27th Aug 2006, 10:55
For me their ability to do their job requires that I know as little as possible about them in 'real life', that way I have fewer obsticles to accepting what they say in character as being some sort of truth.

Yes. The other night there was something on the telly with Les Dennis being all angry and stuff with what was presumably his partner. I just coulnd't stop thinking that's Les Dennis. :-)

gil
29th Aug 2006, 12:24
We're back to the The Artist or the Art debate. You have to separate the two. I'd guess most of the great artists, actors, writers, singers and musicians in the world are either boring or repulsive in real life. If you care what they get up to in private, you'll never enjoy their work. Also, quite a lot of really duff performers are terribly nice people [there are exceptions - see Craziness]. If you want to enjoy the art, forget who they really are.

amner
29th Aug 2006, 12:31
I suspect amner is lying down right now with a cold flannel.

Almost true. :oops:

Ahem.

Yes, pretty spectacular. Noticed a million 'opening 3rd Nov' posters for The Sound of Music in London yesterday, by the way.

HP
29th Aug 2006, 12:49
We're back to the The Artist or the Art debate. You have to separate the two. I'd guess most of the great artists, actors, writers, singers and musicians in the world are either boring or repulsive in real life. If you care what they get up to in private, you'll never enjoy their work. Also, quite a lot of really duff performers are terribly nice people [there are exceptions - see Craziness]. If you want to enjoy the art, forget who they really are.

Right with you (and JM for that matter, too) on this. But it's not quite the point I was making. I don't care how ghastly an artist is as a person, providing they deliver the goods as far as their art is concerned. So to use my earlier examples, in RL Russell Crowe is a conceited thug, but his performances on screen are excellent, so no probs watching him at all. On the other hand, Julia-the-gob-Roberts is a whingeing self-regarding bore, who displays not one iota of charm or talent on screen (as far as I'm concerned) so watching her brings no reward at all. And so great is her irritation factor, that coupled with her dearth of ability, I boycott whatever film she's in, no matter how good the performances of her fellow actors, or how good the overall film is. In short:

lovable and likeable + talent = what's not to like?!

unlovable and unlikeable + talent = bring it on even so!

unlovable and unlikeable - talent = all round waste of space, so bugger 'em!

Miriamaok
29th Aug 2006, 17:35
Noticed a million 'opening 3rd Nov' posters for The Sound of Music in London yesterday, by the way.


I see that Simon Shepherd has been signed up to play Captain Von Trapp beating Anthony Head (forever Giles in my head) and Robert Lindsay for the role.

Colyngbourne
3rd Sep 2006, 13:59
I fear that Siobhan is being set up to win HDYSaPLM - the beautiful girl-next-door who only just squeezed into the competition, and thinks of her gran when she needs to put a bit of emotion into a song :oops: Pah!

I get what those in favour are saying but she's not consistent enough to make me think she can pull off a 'Songbird' style effect for two+ hours six-times-a-week.

John Self
3rd Sep 2006, 17:20
Well I think it's right and proper that the contest looks like coming down to Aoife v Connie v Siobhan, and while I'd like to see Aoife win it, I'd be happy with any of them. Siobhan I thought not only gave her best performance yet last night - which, notably, was her first opportunity to sing the sort of song she'd have to do onstage - but the best performance of the evening. And her frankly radiant beauty don't hurt neither.

OmS
3rd Sep 2006, 19:01
Did anyone see Shoot the Messenger, a play that was screened last Tuesday on BBC2? It seems to have become very controversial, with some people calling it the most racist TV they have ever seen. Unfortunately I missed the first half of it (I hope the BBC repeat it so I can catch the first half), but it seemed to be an examination of black British culture from the point of view of a black male teacher who despairs at his black pupils' lack of interest in education. It was powerful stuff - at one point he gets punched for suggesting that black people have to "get over slavery".
As I say, I only saw half of it so it would be unfair of me to make a definitive judgement (actually, knowing only half the story has never stopped me being judgemental in the past, but since this is my first ever post I'll try to be good), but it seemed to be being brave enough to raise some pretty uncomfortable issues. I really didn't get the feeling that it was being racist.
Anyone else any views on it?

John Self
3rd Sep 2006, 19:30
Sorry, didn't catch it, OmS, despite the endless trails for it. But welcome to Palimpsest anyway!

Noumenon
4th Sep 2006, 0:46
I only saw a glimpse of this myself, but as usual the outcry seems to miss the point: that there is a difference between being racist and discussing racism. That's not necessarily to say that the programme was any good, but even a crap drama about racism isn't automatically racist - it might just be crap.

It sounds like the Brass Eye Paedophilia Special all over again. Everyone was so caught up in the "should it / it shouldn't be allowed" riot that no-one stopped to ask if it was funny. In my opinion it was, fairly, but it was also by far the weakest Brass Eye episode. Except for a few highlights, I found it a bit disappointing. But at least I watched it before deciding!

amner
4th Sep 2006, 10:30
Welcome OmS. I suspect that Shoot The Messenger will have a BBC3 or 4 outing at some point. If you have NTL, then it may be on the 'on demand' menu also.

As for HDYSaPLM, I'm just chuffed that Abi clung on for another week. Close call.

OmS
4th Sep 2006, 19:43
An interesting analogy, Noumenon, at least inasmuch the controvesy. But I think a lot of the problem over the Brass Eye programme was people confusing the spoof element with truth. Shoot The Messenger was not a spoof - the main actor was just expressing some pretty unpalatable opinions in a way which was not open to misinterpretation.
The upset (for some people) came not from misunderstanding, but from finding those opinions so unpalatable, and so contrary to their own views that they struck out against them, calling them racist.
People have widely different ideas of what constitutes racism. This drama seemed to be involved in mere criticism of a race, which is not racism in my book.

ono no komachi
5th Sep 2006, 8:55
But doesn't criticism of a race, when applied to all people of that race, constitute racism? Much as criticism of one or other sex in its entirety would constitute sexism?

OmS
5th Sep 2006, 10:49
But doesn't criticism of a race, when applied to all people of that race, constitute racism? Much as criticism of one or other sex in its entirety would constitute sexism?

Thanks, ono, for giving me pause for thought.
I suppose I‘ve put it too simplistically. Let me just write what comes into my head, here, and you can criticise it as you see fit.

I guess that the criticism has to be reasoned and not malicious. For example, suppose the chap in the programme sees that many of his black schoolkids do poorly at school compared with the non-black kids. He does a properly-conducted survey, which confirms his suspicions. He does some social science research which suggests that the black community’s general attitude to education is negative (not EVERY member of the black community, but in general). He sees this, from his point of view, as a problem inasmuch as he sees black kids not being “successful” in conventional ways. So, in order to improve matters, he criticises the attitude of the black community to education. I don’t think that that is racist, because its reasoned and not malicious. However, it is criticising, in a fairly broad manner, black Britons.

If he saw that the black kids were doing poorly and said it was because black people are stupid, then that’s racist.
Does that sound better?

I suppose you could apply similar arguments to the criticism of religions that the mealy-mouthed Labour administration (I hesitate to call it a government) is so dead against. To suggest that you can’t criticise a religion is, to my mind, walking away from the principle of free speech. Free speech is why I live in this country (and why I’ve become a member of Palimpsest).

ono no komachi
5th Sep 2006, 11:47
I'm completely with you on the religion thing, questioning why someone believes the thing they believe seems completely reasonable to me.

Lucoid
5th Sep 2006, 14:10
i asked mini-me how he would feel about doing without telly. i expected uproar. he shrugged his shoulders (once he knew this would not mean foregoing playstation) and said he wasn't bothered!

wonderful. i've pulled out the aerial thingy and now i don't have to pretend i keep missing things on the telly. i actually don't pay my license nor watch the bally thing.

Well done Kumquat! So much braver than I am.

I'd recommend looking into getting your telly doctored so you can't actually use it to receive broadcasts any more, or you could end up with a fine from the licensing people. They'll be happy enough if you have a certificate to show them that it's out of action.

John Self
5th Sep 2006, 14:27
Yes Lucoid, I was going to say that. Pulling out the aerial won't be enough (otherwise everyone would do it when the licence man came calling). At the minute you don't need a licence for a PC which you can use to view again TV programmes on the BBC site, for example, but I expect that will change. You do need one if your PC has a broadcast card to pick up live TV.

Stewart
5th Sep 2006, 15:53
At the minute you don't need a licence for a PC which you can use to view again TV programmes on the BBC site, for example, but I expect that will change. You do need one if your PC has a broadcast card to pick up live TV.

Strange, I distinctly remember them saying that you could still be prosecuted if watching the World Cup earlier this year on the BBC site without a regular TV license. Must be the papers stirring up shit.

HP
6th Sep 2006, 10:59
Ah, I see the Irwin debate has moved ..... on my way ...

John Self
6th Sep 2006, 11:02
No, to me 'the great unwashed' has a definite class-sneering air to it, I'm afraid Honey! (And now that Steve Irwin has his own thread, this diversion can remain here...)

gil
6th Sep 2006, 11:04
his behaviour and attitude towards our fellow living creatures was a VERY BAD EXAMPLE.Oh, I don't know... Anyone who follows his example by picking up a black mamba by the tail is an obvious candidate for the Darwin Awards, and will quickly be eliminated from the gene pool.

HP
6th Sep 2006, 11:08
Perzackly! And so it came to pass!

Colyngbourne
9th Sep 2006, 20:19
Commiserations, amner, as Abi bows out.

Miriamaok
10th Sep 2006, 9:23
I was in the audience last night for HDYSAPLM and I thought that Aoife was robbed! She should have made it to the final. I was really impressed with Helena as well. Both her and Siobhan were in shock to make it to the last 3. I hope one of them wins - I find Connie too stage-schooly for my liking.

Colyngbourne
10th Sep 2006, 9:30
we thought Aiofe was robbed too. That last song from Evita, she inhabited the song and was Evita; whereas Siobhan just sang it like an automaton. She is like someone from a make-up advert - all glossy faced and perfect but no personality. and we also cheered Helena's vast improvement in performance. Also, Aiofe is a good actress, whereas Siobhan dried up completely in the 'romantic talk' acting session with John. She would be good for Truly Scrumptious but not Maria.

But still Connie to win out of those last three. If not, then Helena; but not Siobhan. John B said he would pay £60 to see Connie, but I wouldn't pay it to see Siobhan.

And eek! I'll miss the final next week at Wavid's wedding! Will have to record it.

(And the squealing in our house when John did the kissing exercise was deafening ;-) )

John Self
10th Sep 2006, 12:25
Yes, robbed all right (though we voted for Aoife twice...). Why they gave her Footloose to sing is completely beyond me, unless they wanted her to get kicked out. Her voice was too low down in the mix, and the energetic dancing (which she did perfectly well, despite JohnB and AndrewL's complaints to the contrary) meant she couldn't sing her best anyway.

I also though Siobhan's performance of All That Jazz was exemplary: it exhibited the sort of 'safe sexiness' (and I don't mean that insultingly) she excels at. The producers of Chicago should be on the phone to her if she doesn't win. The other best performance of last night was Abi, whose voice is probably my favourite of all the Marias, though I accept she isn't really Maria material.

All in all I'd like Siobhan to win, though it's from a poor selection, and I agree she can't really act, on the basis of what we saw last night. Helena's wicked-witch-of-the-west face and constant gurning is just beyond a joke by now, and Connie is indeed far too stage-school, tends to over-emote too much (a mild form of the disorder which Helena suffers from) and looks far too old (she's 23 but looks ten years older). But yes, Connie it probably will be.

I read in a paper somewhere that the winner will just be an understudy for the part anyway. Can this be true?

Miriamaok
11th Sep 2006, 10:03
I read in a paper somewhere that the winner will just be an understudy for the part anyway. Can this be true?

In this interview (http://www.thesun.co.uk/article/0,,2001320029-2006410398,00.html) with The Sun, Andrew insists: “We have one standby, who will do two performances a week, and the winner of the show will perform six times a week.

amner
15th Sep 2006, 10:09
Commiserations, amner, as Abi bows out.

I'm still struggling. A week in the country retreat did nothing to ease the pain.

Ahem...anyhoo...Connie to win.

Colyngbourne
18th Sep 2006, 7:51
And Spooks returns! The Harry-appreciation can resume 8)

We watched both episodes last night - excellent stuff.

epsilon minus
18th Sep 2006, 15:40
I always thought that Sliders deserved to be a lot more popular and critically acclaimed than it was. Conversely, Friends has got to be the most overrated, vapid piece of shite ever to disgrace the small screen.

Jennifer
21st Sep 2006, 18:40
Two brilliant, if for different reasons, bits of telly I saw recently:

The Secret Life of a Manic-Depressive

I will freely admit that I worship Stephen Fry and the capacious thought-engine that is his brain. I will also freely admit that I watched this with a sense of prying fascination - famous person, real-life story. It was, however, (and do we expect anything less of the Greatest Living Englishman?) moving and self-deprecatingly funny. Though acknowledging the idea that mania can sometimes aid creativity, the programme did not seek to enhance the silly cachet that mental illness can have in our issue-obsessed society; the idea that "you have to be mad to work here". It showed the potentially terrible consequences of violent mood-swings without judging or alienating its subjects. Plus I think Mr Fry was his usual amusing self - if a little more candid than I've seen before. There wasn't much of that "tears of a clown" stuff you might have expected, but I was left with a sense of sadness over how many people live daily with this and similar conditions, and haven't got the compensation of fame and success.

Ballet Saved My Life

Yep, it's another piece of reality pop-anthropology: put a gang of dysfunctional teenagers into ballet training and see what happens. Actually, I think this was more of a valid project than some: these weren't just badly-behaved kids, they were seriously damaged young people with very little in their lives to encourage them, and ballet was supposed to provide some sort of substitute for the stability and order they should have been getting at home and school, along with a boost to self-confidence. But they had to put it on TV, didn't they? I know it's hard to get funding for these kinds of projects without telly backing it, but I did think that prying into deep and painful problems should not necessarily have been the focus of this programme. I don't know, maybe I'm a prude, but it looked exploitative to me. Why not focus on the positive changes ballet was making, instead of "The kids now think they've heard the worst. But this girl's father murdered her mother..." shock-horror stuff. Good idea crassly executed I think.

Anyone see either of these? I didn't think my rambling thoughts were thread-worthy on their own.

John Self
26th Sep 2006, 16:55
And so, farewell BBC ONE station idents, the red-clad skateboarders (filmed at Belfast's Harland & Wolff shipyard, fact fans)/dancers/trapeze artists etc. - you know, the ones which were dismissed by the tabloids as 'politically correct' when they were first unveiled, because they had a black wheelchair user in one of them. Here (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/in_pictures/5381642.stm)are the new ones, and BBC one's new logo.

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/42131000/jpg/_42131098_shells_416.jpg

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/42131000/jpg/_42131096_roses_416.jpg

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/42131000/jpg/_42131082_flats_416.jpg

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/42131000/jpg/_42131092_moon_416.jpg

£1.2m well spent.

Colyngbourne
9th Oct 2006, 22:12
Didn't we know something bad would happen? :cry: I've spent the last ten minutes of Spooks, crying my eyes out over Ruth and Harry.

Hekaterine
10th Oct 2006, 8:33
Col, what happened? I used to like Spooks in my telly-owning days and I noticed in an earlier post you mentioned Ruth and Harry seemed to be getting it together. Usually that means someone is going to be killed off...

Colyngbourne
10th Oct 2006, 9:14
Okay - hope this isn't too confusing -
The Joint Intelligence Committee (minus MI5) were covering up the 'removal' of seven suspected terrorists from a prison so that they could illegally torture them for info. Though entirely innocent, Ruth was framed for the death of one of the prison security men who was trying to get the truth out. She was the pawn used to try to get Harry to come into the inner govt circle who had arranged the torture of the suspected terrorists. Ultimately MI5 were framed into sacrificing one of their own in order to maintain their incorruptibility. Harry was willing to jettison himself to save Ruth from a murder charge but in the end Ruth took it upon herself and had to 'disappear' forever. It was heartbreaking and both actors were superb - esp. Harry in a scene confronting Oliver Mace at his Club.

amner
10th Oct 2006, 10:17
When I grow up I want to marry Ruth. She's wonderful.

Hekaterine
10th Oct 2006, 15:02
Col, that's that's so sad! No wonder you needed the tissues. I love Harry. I don't want to grow up I just want him to be my dad.

Colyngbourne
10th Oct 2006, 15:16
He's not a 'dad' figure for me ;-) Not after Equus and Dominick Hyde. I'd be his Ruth any day. Every week when he was trying to ask her out to dinner, I'd say to the room at large - "I'll go out with you to dinner anytime, Harry."

amner
10th Oct 2006, 15:31
Calm down, Col!

Colyngbourne
10th Oct 2006, 15:34
(looks around for HoneyPotts...)

*is calm*

http://dvdtoile.com/ARTISTES/7/7399.jpg

*or maybe not* 8)

And those of us who remember him in the Double-Deckers:

http://www.70slivekidvid.com/double/tscoop.jpg

Digger
10th Oct 2006, 15:42
phffffff!

He grew up well, and 'Scooper'?! Ho Hum, I don't remember it so can't really criticise... and anyway, me 'n my Michael Praed fixation are not really one to talk....

amner
10th Oct 2006, 15:54
Col will remember this, too:

http://www.thegreysweatsuitrevolution.com/Equus.jpg


from Equus, of course. I won't put any of the nuddy ones on here.

jim
10th Oct 2006, 17:32
That vest he's got on could do with a bit of a boil-wash. Who was the girl in The Flipside of Dominic Hyde? I remember being very taken with her as a young boy. I'm guessing it must have been about 1980ish.

amner
10th Oct 2006, 17:47
Caroline Langrishe.

http://www.leninimports.com/caroline_langrishe_gallery_5.jpg

Can't disagree there, jim!

Colyngbourne
10th Oct 2006, 17:48
Ah, you beat me to it. Did I ever loan you my video of that, amner?

amner
10th Oct 2006, 17:55
Yes, I'll return, I promise!

Colyngbourne
31st Oct 2006, 21:12
An unfortunately weak episode of Spooks last night. Christian fundamentalist terrorists just didn't seem scary enough, and Wesley disappearing was very weak. And the bishop! No self-respecting bishop (or priest for that matter) would go around shouting at the altar/picture of Jesus/crucifix, complaining that Jesus doesn't understand what it's like, and how it's easy for him (same stupid behaviour occurs in the film Priest). Whoever wrote the script was clearly not in touch with Lambeth Palace or whoever gives info on what bishops might be like (in fact they'd probably just sat down with a DVD of Priest, and broadly adapted Linus Roache's shouty scene). Very sad and useless.

Adam cracking up was good though ;-)

ono no komachi
1st Nov 2006, 8:41
Anyone else been watching Simon Schama's The Power of Art? The programme on Bernini better than the opener on Caravaggio, I thought. And I like his focus on a few key works as contrasted with Tim Marlow's shows where he tends to quickly sequence through relatively numerous works (but I like his shows too, they're just different.)

Colyngbourne
1st Nov 2006, 9:25
I enjoyed the Bernini one - he has a way of presenting insights into how the pieces of art work and how they can be interpreted without being either sneering or over-the-top.

Miriamaok
1st Nov 2006, 16:54
I'm looking forward to The State Within (http://www.bbc.co.uk/drama/thestatewithin/about/index.shtml) which starts tomorrow night on BBC 1. It's been getting quite good reviews and I'm intrigued to see Sharon Gless at the US Secretary of Defence.

HP
6th Nov 2006, 17:45
Just to remind folks that if you're a fan of David Attenborough and want to see some of the best natural life photography ever - tune in tonight to a repeat showing of his Planet Earth series at 7.00pm on BBC2. They aired this episode yesterday - life in the arctic - and I caught most of it, but not all. As you would expect, it's an absolute beaut.

John Self
6th Nov 2006, 17:47
Yes, it was terrific. I usually get bored halfway through these things (no offence to Sir Dave) but this was gripping throughout. And the little making-of featurette at the end was even more fascinating!

Noumenon
6th Nov 2006, 17:52
Did anyone see the first part of Into The West? I saw it being thoroughly torn to shreds on Newsnight Review (if that's what it's called) although they seemed generally impressed with Borat: The Movie, so who knows.

ono no komachi
6th Nov 2006, 18:18
Just to remind folks that if you're a fan of David Attenborough and want to see some of the best natural life photography ever - tune in tonight to a repeat showing of his Planet Earth series at 7.00pm on BBC2. They aired this episode yesterday - life in the arctic - and I caught most of it, but not all. As you would expect, it's an absolute beaut.

Oh my word, between the emotional rollercoaster lives of the elephants in The Natural World earlier on Sunday evening, and the polar bear and penguin tales in this at nine, by the end of the evening I was like a limp rag.

(And how great was that shot of the polar bear's nose up against the window of the hut!?)

Colyngbourne
6th Nov 2006, 18:27
It was heartbreaking to see the polar bear scutching down into a hole by the walruses and struggling to get onto firm ice. But the bear who came to the hut window was terrifying - they are really scary animals.

HP
6th Nov 2006, 18:33
It was heartbreaking to see the polar bear scutching down into a hole by the walruses and struggling to get onto firm ice.

Yes, if I was there I'd have been screaming for a vet at the very least. To stand by and watch that poor animal suffer knowing he would likely die without medical treatment must be difficult for the crew. But their remit, as they explained, is not to interfere with nature, but merely to record it. Although, they did cheat (thankfully) by rescuing that trapped baby penguin.

But watching these programmes, you can't help but be struck by the law of the wild that says for one animal to survive another must die.

Hekaterine
6th Nov 2006, 18:52
Christian fundamentalist terrorists

What did they do, pray for a bomb to drop on the bad guys?

Kimberley
7th Nov 2006, 10:10
What did they do, pray for a bomb to drop on the bad guys?

And on the eighth day, God said let there be bombs and let them smite the heathen unbelievers, and then there were bombs, and God saw that they were good.

ono no komachi
13th Nov 2006, 9:42
WARNING: MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS - SPOOKS

I haven't seen much of this last series of Spooks, but even so, I was impressed by this demonstration from Ruth fans.

(From media.guardian.co.uk, but reproduced here because some of their articles require registration.)

The last time viewers of the glossy BBC spy drama Spooks saw much-loved character Ruth she was on a windswept barge on the Thames, leaving a career in M15 and her true love and mentor Harry behind. And until recently that, it seemed, was that. A fortnight or so ago, however, radio silence was broken by a snowballing postbag of mysterious mail at the show's production company, Kudos.

Arriving from as far afield as Fiji, Las Vegas and Pisa, the haul so far includes a birthday card, a breathlessly erudite love letter, a compilation CD of love songs and 100-plus postcards. All purport to be from Ruth and are addressed to Harry. Although apparently written out of the series, she seems to live on through this welter of fan mail.

Kudos' team of forensics eventually traced the papertrail to web forum Spooksjonsto.com, where superfans had convened to campaign for Ruth's reinstatement. But whereas, say, the fans of singer-songwriter Fiona Apple inundated her record label Epic with apples to irritate them into releasing her second album, the Spooks fans opted for a creative approach more akin to fan fiction.

In keeping with Ruth's well-read persona, the love letter made reference to Shelley's romantic ode Epipsychidion. Postcards inscribed in Latin, Cornish and Fijian have also invoked Shakespearian sonnets and quoted King Offa, an Anglo-Saxon king, who, only the most ardent Ruthettes would have remembered, she studied for her dissertation. Perhaps best of all, a rendezvous for the two spies was suggested via Morse code and, as the fan forum reveals, plans are afoot to send a peelable postcard that reveals a hidden message, just like the ones on the show. Whether Ruth returns to the fold is in the hands of executive producer Simon Crawford Collins. While he's thrilled with the postcards, "which show how passionately committed the fans are to the characters and the show", he remains tight-lipped regarding Ruth's fate. But given Spooks' form for killing off characters, which began with Lisa Faulkner going headfirst into a deep-fat fryer in the second episode, it looks as though, wherever Ruth has gone, she will be away for some time.

Hekaterine
16th Nov 2006, 9:40
QAF


???

Colyngbourne
16th Nov 2006, 9:47
Queer as Folk (also by Russell T Davies)

Hekaterine
16th Nov 2006, 10:00
Aah. Thank you Col.

Colyngbourne
16th Nov 2006, 10:47
Too many plaudits to reproduce here but the critics seem to judge The Sound of Music (with How Do You Solve A Problem's Connie) as a ****0/***** success:

The Times (http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,14936-2455245,00.html)

The Indy (http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk/theatre/reviews/article1987611.ece)

The Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2006/11/16/nsofm16.xml)

The Grauniad (http://arts.guardian.co.uk/critic/review/0,,1948872,00.html)

John Self
16th Nov 2006, 10:58
Crikey! All Connie's fears proved unfounded, then!